mirror


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mir·ror

(mir'ŏr),
A polished surface reflecting the rays of light reflected from objects in front of it.
[Fr. miroir, fr. L. miror, to wonder at]

mirror

/mir·ror/ (mir´er) a polished surface that reflects sufficient light to yield images of objects in front of it.
dental mirror  mouth m.
frontal mirror , head mirror a circular mirror strapped to the head of the examiner, used to reflect light into a cavity, especially the nose, pharynx, or larynx.
mouth mirror  a small mirror attached at an angle to a handle, for use in dentistry.
noun An archiving device written to more than one hard disk simultaneously, so that if one disk fails, the computer continues to function without loss of data
verb To maintain an exact copy of a file or database

mirror

Informatics noun An archiving device written to more than one hard disk simultaneously, so that if one disk fails, the computer continues to function without loss of data verb To maintain an exact copy of a file or database. See FTP, Web Paranormal See Mind mirror.

mir·ror

(mir'ŏr)
A polished surface reflecting the rays of light reflected from objects in front of it.

mirror

A surface capable of reflecting light rays and forming optical images. Such surfaces are smooth or polished, made of highly polished metal, or a thin film of metal (e.g. aluminium) on glass, quartz or plastic. Object distance l and image distance l′ relate to the focal distance f or the radius of curvature r of the mirror, as follows
2/r represents the refractive power of the mirror, in air. If the medium that contains the incident and reflected rays is n, the power becomes F = 2n/r and the focal length, f = r/2n (Fig. M12). See focal length; fundamental paraxial equation; catadioptric system.
back surface mirror A mirror which reflects from the back surface of a refracting layer, usually glass. See front surface mirror.
concave mirror A mirror with a spherical concave surface forming an erect, magnified, virtual image when the distance from the mirror is less than the focal distance and an inverted real image when the object distance is greater than the focal distance (Fig. M12).
convex mirror A mirror with a spherical convex surface forming a virtual, erect and diminished image (Fig. M12).
front surface mirror A mirror that reflects directly from its front surface. The advantages of this type are that, unlike back surface mirrors, there is no chromatic effect as the glass is not used optically, therefore ultraviolet rays can be used which would otherwise be absorbed in the glass and there is no ghost reflection from the front surface. However, these mirrors can be easily scratched and the coating may tarnish. Often a coating of silicon monoxide is evaporated on top of the surface, but this causes a loss of reflectivity. See ghost image; back surface mirror.
plane mirror A mirror whose surface is plane and forms a virtual image of the same size as the object. Object and image distances are equal.
semi-silvered mirror See beam splitter.
mirror writing Writing backward, Latin letters being written from right to left and the details of the letters reversed. The writing thus appears normal when viewed in a mirror. Syn. retrography.
Fig. M12 Image of an object O formed in A, a concave mirror and B, a convex mirror. Four rays are drawn in each case for completeness, but two would suffice (C, centre of curvature; F ′, focal point; f ′, focal length; l and l ′, object and image length; r , radius of curvature)enlarge picture
Fig. M12 Image of an object O formed in A, a concave mirror and B, a convex mirror. Four rays are drawn in each case for completeness, but two would suffice (C, centre of curvature; F′, focal point; f′, focal length; l and l′, object and image length; r, radius of curvature)

mir·ror

(mir'ŏr)
A polished surface reflecting the rays of light reflected from objects in front of it; particularly useful in visualizing structures in the oral cavity.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adding mirrored tiles to a splashback can throw light into a kitchen and be a welcome distraction on a dull wall, while positioning a mirror opposite a window can reflect and enhance a stunning view.
In previous studies, only a few species--people, great apes, and dolphins--reliably attend to marks on themselves that are visible only in mirrors.
In holding that the transaction was not a tax-flee reorganization, the court determined that the economic substance of Times Mirror's management of the SMLLC's assets represented boot; thus, Times Mirror did not receive stock of the requisite 80% value, as required by Sec.
In the Mirror, the realism that the humanism of Guicciardini and Machiavelli and Thomas More had advocated as proper ways to read history enters a dialectical relationship with metaphor, character, and, if not the world of allegory and Arthurian magic, a space where language evokes its own kind of transcendence and "still point of the turning world.
Don't go too small, which is what too many people do and they end up with a mirror the size of a photo frame that looked pretty in the store.
This metaphorical use of the arrested time of memory's repetitive moments was felt in White Nights, a labyrinth whose path Morris traced from memory based on the one he'd made here a year earlier, and which called on the "private memory" of Mirror Film, on the one hand, and on the collective memory evoked by archival photographs on the other.
You don't notice spies behind the mirror because they're hiding in the dark.
In order to understand fully the implications of "passing" for identity-formation, it may be useful to examine the passing figure's confrontation with the mirror from two similar, yet distinct, theoretical vantage points: first, from the point of view of Lacan's identity theory, and then from the more racially aware perspective of Henry Louis Gates's theory of "Signification.
1 Analysis of the Addressable Market for Smart Mirror Technologies in Medical/Healthcare Applications
Top choice: a Flower & Parrot mirror decorated in either mother of pearl or white bone, pounds 275.
It's clear that capuchins don't regard their mirror image as that of a stranger," de Waal says.
4 million option provision was part of a $50 million loan package from Times Mirror, which was used to finance the Daily News' purchase for $130 million in 1998.