miotic


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Related to miotic: pilocarpine

miotic

 [mi-ot´ik]
1. pertaining to, characterized by, or causing miosis (contraction of the pupil).
2. an agent that so acts.

mi·ot·ic

(mī-ot'ik),
1. Relating to or characterized by constriction of the pupil.
2. An agent that causes the pupil to constrict so that the pupils are small.

miotic

/mi·ot·ic/ (mi-ot´ik)
1. pertaining to, characterized by, or producing miosis.
2. an agent that causes contraction of the pupil.

miotic

(mī-ŏt′ĭk)
n.
A substance that causes constriction of the pupil of the eye.
adj.
Characterized by, involving, or causing miosis.

miotic

[mē·ot′ik]
1 adj, pertaining to miosis.
2 adj, causing constriction of the pupil of the eye.
3 n, any substance or pharmaceutic, such as pilocarpine, that causes constriction of the pupil of the eye. Such agents are used in the treatment of glaucoma.

mi·ot·ic

(mī-ot'ik)
1. Relating to or characterized by contraction of the pupil.
2. An agent that causes the pupil to contract.

miotic

A drug that constricts the pupil.

Miotic

A drug that causes pupils to contract.
Mentioned in: Glaucoma

mi·ot·ic

(mī-ot'ik)
An agent that causes the pupil to constrict so that the pupils are smaller.

miotic (mēot´ik),

n a drug that constricts the pupil.

miotic

1. pertaining to, characterized by or causing miosis.
2. an agent that causes contraction of the pupil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: glaucoma, intraocular pressure, lower intraocular pressure, eye pressure, topical medications, eye drops, miotics, blurred vision, side effects, common side effects, epinephrine, beta blockers, beta blockers for glaucoma, sensitive to light, night vision, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, contact lenses, soft contact lenses, prostaglandin analogs, laser surgery, trabeculoplasty, incisional surgery
Acknowledging that even the most experienced cataract surgeon can encounter unfortunate circumstances, the contributors describe aspects of the edgier side of procedures, such as subluxated cataracts, dislocated lens fragments, suprahard or posterior polar cataracts, infectious endophthalmitis, and miotic pupils.
If the patient remains symptomatic and neuroadaptation does not occur, ophthalmologists may use weak concentrations of miotic drugs (that is pilocarpine) to decrease pupil size and reduce the appearance of halos and glare.
On examination, the pupil of the left eye was miotic, and the fundus could not be visualized.
Pharmacologic blockade: This can be caused by miotic or dilating drugs (topical absorption).