miosis


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Related to miosis: meiosis, Horner's syndrome

miosis

 [mi-o´sis]
excessive contraction of the pupil.

mi·o·sis

(mī-ō'sis), Do not confuse this word with meiosis.
1. Contraction of the pupil.
2. Incorrect alternative spelling for meiosis.
[G. meiōsis, a lessening]

miosis

/mi·o·sis/ (mi-o´sis) contraction of the pupil.

miosis

also

myosis

(mī-ō′sĭs)
n. pl. mio·ses (-sēz)
Constriction of the pupil of the eye, resulting from a normal response to an increase in light or caused by certain drugs or pathological conditions.

miosis

[mī·ō′sis]
Etymology: Gk, meiosis, becoming less
1 contraction of the sphincter muscle of the iris, causing the pupil to become smaller. Certain drugs and stimulation of the pupillary light reflex result in miosis.
2 an abnormal condition characterized by excessive constriction of the sphincter muscle of the iris, resulting in pinpoint pupils. Compare mydriasis.

miosis

Contraction of the pupil.

miosis

Contraction of the pupil. Cf Mydriasis.

mi·o·sis

(mī-ō'sis)
1. Contraction of the pupil.
2. Incorrect alternative spelling for meiosis.
[G. meiōsis, a lessening]

miosis

Constriction of the pupil.

miosis (mī·ōˑ·sis),

n an ocular condition characterized by excessive constriction of the sphincter muscles of the iris; results in small pupils; stimulation of the pupillary reflex by an increase in light and certain drugs may result in temporary miosis.

miosis

Contraction of the pupil or condition in which the pupil is very small (2 mm or less in diameter). It can be brought about by a spasm of the sphincter muscle or by the effect of a miotic drug (e.g. eserine, neostigmine, pilocarpine), or in certain spinal diseases or any stimulation of the parasympathetic supply to the eye. Miosis occurs naturally when doing close work or when stimulated by light. Note: also spelt myosis. See corneal reflex; pupil light reflex; baring of the blind spot; Horner's syndrome.

mi·o·sis

(mī-ō'sis)
Contraction of the pupil.
[G. meiōsis, a lessening]

miosis

(mīō´sis),
n 1. the contraction of the sphincter muscle of the iris, causing the pupil to become smaller.
n 2. an abnormal condition characterized by excessive constriction of the sphincter muscle of the iris, resulting in very small, pinpoint pupils.

miosis, myosis

excessive contraction of the pupil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Marked mydriasis rather than miosis may be seen due to severe hypoxia in overdose situations.
3%, has been approved by the FDA for use during cataract surgery or intraocular lens (IOL) replacement to maintain pupil size by preventing intraoperative miosis (pupil constriction) and to reduce postoperative ocular pain.
Seizures cause a spectrum of pupillary abnormalities that include mydriasis (3), miosis (4) and hippus (5).
The constellation of ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis in our patient suggested the diagnosis of Horner's syndrome.
In addition, at least one of the following autonomic features must be present: conjunctival injection and/or lacrimation, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhea, or ptosis and/or miosis.
On examination, he was noted to have left-sided ptosis, diplopia, and miosis.
Attacks occur five or more times a day, typically last 2-30 minutes, and often are accompanied by autonomic symptoms such as lacrimation, rhinorrhea, eyelid edema, and miosis, but not restlessness or agitation, which are more characteristic of cluster headache.
Physical examination showed a right-sided oculosympathetic palsy consisting of miosis and ptosis.
Like all organophosphates, chlorpyrifos can cause acute poisoning; well-known symptoms include miosis, increased urination, diarrhea, diaphoresis, lacrimation, and salivation (2).
Symptoms of exposure that can readily be identified include salivation, nausea, headache, blurred vision, miosis, cyanosis and uncontrollable muscle twitches followed by muscular weakness (13).
5%) reported, regardless of causality, in patients treated with aprepitant 40 mg for postoperative nausea and vomiting included: bowel sounds abnormal, dysarthria, miosis, sensory disturbance, stomach discomfort, visual acuity reduced, wheezing.
Pupils react briskly to changes in illumination, however, mydriasis occurs more slowly than miosis.