mindfulness meditation


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mindfulness meditation

a technique of meditation in which distracting thoughts and feelings are not ignored but are rather acknowledged and observed nonjudgmentally as they arise to create a detachment from them and gain insight and awareness.

mindfulness meditation

A form of meditation or induced relaxation that focuses awareness on breathing and encourages positive attitudes to achieve a healthy, balanced mental state. Mindful meditation is advocated for reducing reactions to stress by inducing the relaxation response, lowering the heart rate, reducing anxiety, and encouraging positive thought patterns and attitudes. Practitioners of mindfulness meditation aim to cultivate self-awareness, and a nonjudgmental, loving, kind, and compassionate feeling toward themselves and others. See: relaxation response
See also: meditation
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The study compared mindfulness meditation and psycho-educational treatments for combat-related PTSD using a telehealth approach.
Mechanisms for the ameliorating effect of mindfulness meditation on substance addiction rely upon the acceptance and "unfiltered present moment experiencing" of mental urges (sometimes referred to as "urge surfing").
Using data from 47 earlier studies, researchers found moderate evidence to support the use of mindfulness meditation to treat those conditions.
An outpatient program in behavioral medicine for chronic pain patients based on the practice of mindfulness meditation : Theoretical considerations and preliminary results.
Mindfulness meditation sessions were offered in the school setting during the eight-week intervention period.
Mindfulness meditation is seen as a valuable instrument to ease and discard mindless and restless states in our daily life and habits and transform away from the negative towards positive impulses (Hyland, 2009, 2010).
The mindfulness based approach to teaching business ethics calls on business teachers to teach mindfulness meditation and open inquiry skills to their students.
The results were stunning: Over the next few weeks, while participating in the mindfulness meditation class, she became almost headache free.
Her answer to the question of how she deals with the stress - "I dance" - directed me toward offering her mindfulness meditation.
In general, they can be broken into three groups: (a) devotional meditation, which is often associated with the Christian tradition; (b) mantra meditation, which can be focused or unfocused; and (c) mindfulness meditation.
The idea of accepting, welcoming, and being open to drifting thoughts while remaining focused in each moment and unique experience separates the mindfulness meditation from other meditative techniques (McBee, 2008).
The following exercise, adapted from Full Catastrophe Living: How to Cope With Stress, Pain and Illness Using Mindfulness Meditation (Kabat-Zinn, 1996), uses the breath as a tool to become more mindful through concentrating on the moment-to-moment sensations of breathing.