mimesis


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mi·me·sis

(mi-mē'sis, mī-),
1. Hysteric simulation of organic disease.
2. The symptomatic imitation of one organic disease by another.
[G. mimēsis, imitation, fr. mimeomai, to mimic]

mimesis

/mi·me·sis/ (mĭ-me´sis) the simulation of one disease by another.mimet´ic

mimesis

(mĭ-mē′sĭs, mī-)
n.
1. Biology Mimicry.
2. Medicine The appearance, often caused by hysteria, of symptoms of a disease not actually present.

mi·me·sis

(mi-mē'sis)
1. Hysteric simulation of organic disease.
2. The symptomatic imitation of one organic disease by another.
[G. mimēsis, imitation, fr. mimeomai, to mimic]
References in periodicals archive ?
Viewed as a theater of creation, this field offers a host of images upon which faith-filled vision might gaze in order to contemplate the mimesis of divine beauty.
A pair of slideshows mingles headshots of mutilated First World War combatants (before and after the mimesis of "cosmetic surgery") with photos of figurative sculpture (folk and modern) and samples of traditional African flesh-scarring practices.
Girard argues that "acquisitive mimesis is contagious, and if the number of individuals polarized around a single object increases, other members of the community, as yet not implicated, will tend to follow the example of those who are; conflictual mimesis necessarily follows the same course because the same force is involved.
Cannily juxtaposing allusions to Platonic theory and classical culture with the seemingly alien Christian model of fidelity, Rossetti constructs a counter-history of mimesis that foregrounds the materiality of the work, and recasts mimesis as a matter of artistic practice rather than the relation between copy and original.
the client): Within mimesis, one is defined by one's actions.
The question of honesty is also central to Auerbach's analysis of Homeric and Old Testament styles in "Odysseus' Scar," the first chapter of Mimesis.
When Costello arrives and recites/repeats the opening paragraph of the novel--this time in italics--the disruption of mimesis is also achieved through verbal substitution.
This essay will begin by examining the way in which the principles of Irigaray's speculum can be applied to an analysis of Wollstonecraft's Rights of Woman, before moving on to an examination of the ways in which Wollstonecraft uses mimesis to reveal the inconsistencies of male prescription of eighteenth-century femininity.
And in fact, the novel emphasizes at word of his acquittal Darnay's mimesis of Doctor Manette's being "Recalled to Life": "'If you had sent the message, "Recalled to Life", again,' muttered Jerry, as he turned, 'I should have known what you meant, this time.
According to Lambert Zuidervaart, mimesis in Aesthetic Theory refers to "an archaic openness to the other, to the disparate and diffuse and contrary;" mimetic openness, which, because of the condition of total reification in capitalist society, has been driven away from everyday experience as well as from rational knowledge production, "lives on in artworks whose form accommodates the conflicting impulses of their content".
Beginning with Plato's denunciation of imagination as childishly irrational imitation, and moving from there to Aristotle's acceptance of mimesis in the Poetics as innately human and healthy, Witmore then traces the debate from Quintilian and Cicero to Luther and Calvin and through a range of English Renaissance authors such as Foxe, Munday, Cranmer, Whitgift, Hooker, and Thomas Wright.
From the way musicians handle instruments, to the notes they play, to the manner in which sounds are recorded and mixed, every aspect of the recording is most often meant to play down or eliminate any suggestion of mimesis.