millibar


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mil·li·bar

(mil'i-bar),
One thousandth of a bar; 100 newtons per m2; 0.75006 mm Hg; standard atmospheric pressure is 1013 millibars.

millibar

(mĭl′ĭ-băr)
One thousandth of a bar, which is 100 newtons/sq m. The normal atmospheric pressure of 14.7 lb/sq in is equal to 1013 millibars.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notice the high uniformity of the molecular flux within the meatus at 1 millibar vacuum level.
2] after filling management Use vacuum at corking -102 millibar after filling Inert gas sparging -- [N.
Note that model output has never been intended for pilots, so they use pressure in millibars.
Weather forecasters use this term when a low-pressure system undergoes bombogenesis, a rapid drop in atmospheric pressure of 24 millibars or more in 24 hours.
This is sparked when central pressure in a depression drops by at least 24 millibars in 24 hours.
A storm is considered a "bomb" when the pressure drops rapidly -- at least 24 millibars in 24 hours.
More specifically, it's when a storm's central pressure drops at least 24 millibars during that time.
The bombogenesis phenomenon occurs when a storm's barometric pressure drops 24 millibars in 24 hours.
This occurs when the central pressure of a low pressure system falls by 24 millibars in 24 hours and can result in violent winds developing around the system.
The Met Office has said: "A 'weather bomb' is an unofficial term for a low pressure system whose central pressure falls 24 millibars in 24 hours, in a process known as explosive cyclogenesis.
The pressure has to fall by 24 millibars in 24 hours to qualify.