midwifery


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midwifery

 [mid´wif-re, mid´wi-fer-e]
the practice of assisting at childbirth.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē),
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, prepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, and/or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.

midwifery

[mid′wīf(ə)rē]
Etymology: AS, midd + wif
the employment of a person who is qualified by special training and experience to assist a woman in childbirth. See also midwife.

midwifery

The health profession which provides care to childbearing women during pregnancy, labour and delivery, after childbirth and with breastfeeding.

mid·wife·ry

(mid-wif'ĕ-rē)
Independent care of essentially normal, healthy women and infants by a midwife, antepartally, intrapartally, postpartally, or obstetrically in a hospital, birth center, or home setting, and including normal delivery of the infant, with medical consultation, collaborative management, and referral of cases in which abnormalities develop; strong emphasis is placed on educational preparation of parents for child-bearing and child-rearing, with an orientation toward childbirth as a normal physiologic process requiring minimal intervention.
See also: doula

midwifery

The nursing speciality concerned with the conduct of antenatal care, labour and childbirth. Midwifery differs from OBSTETRICS to the extent that it is concerned primarily with the normal. Complications and undue difficulties are managed or supervised by doctors specializing in obstetrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Haiti dispatched the first group of midwives last year from its new midwifery school built after the 2010 earthquake.
Viv Bennett, Director of Nursing and Midwifery, said: It is vital that public health nurses and midwives have a strong professional voice and leadership so we can continue to drive improvements in protecting the public s health.
Our analytical focus is diversity because it arose as a significant theme in our interviews with midwives about social change and midwifery practice.
Topics include: midwifery, massage, nutrition, fitness, healthy recipes and other holistic health content.
The histories of the two professions in New Zealand have been intertwined since the indomitable Grace Neill--herself both a midwife and nurse--established registration and education standards for midwifery with the 1904 Midwives Act.
In 1976, the World Health Organization agreed with the International Council of Nurses and the International Confederation of Midwives that midwifery should be recognized as an autonomous discipline.
Midwives are supported during the student's placement through the provision of a preceptor workshop facilitated by the midwifery school.
She had told how one midwifery tutor had been inundated with nearly 1,000 applications for just 16 places on a course she had struggled to fill the previous year.
We've brought together a whole host of nursing and midwifery employers from across the globe who are looking to fill vacancies.
With very few registered midwives across the emirate of Abu Dhabi and with growing demand for their services, we hope the success of our midwifery training program will serve to encourage many more Emiratis to enter this profession," she added.
On 1 April, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, as designed in the Nursing and Midwifery Order 2001, replaces the UK Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visitors (UKCC) and the four National Boards.