midwife


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midwife

 [mid´wīf]
a person who assists at childbirth but who is not a physician.
nurse-midwife see nurse-midwife.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf),
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.
[A.S. mid, with, + wif, wife]

midwife

/mid·wife/ (-wīf) an individual who practices midwifery; see nurse-midwife.

midwife

Etymology: AS, midd + wif
1 also called obstetrix. (in traditional use) a (female) person who assists women in childbirth.
2 (according to the International Confederation of Midwives, World Health Organization, and Federation of International Gynecologists and Obstetricians) "a person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program fully recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery." Among the responsibilities of the midwife are supervision of pregnancy, labor, delivery, and puerperium. The midwife conducts the delivery independently, cares for the newborn, procures medical assistance when necessary, executes emergency measures as required, and may practice in a hospital, clinic, maternity home, or private home. The midwife, whose practice may also include well-child care, family planning, and some aspects of gynecology, is often an important source of health counseling in the community.
3 a nurse midwife or Certified Nurse Midwife.

midwife

Medspeak-UK
A trained health professional in the UK, typically female, who provides assistance and primary medical care to women throughout pregnancy, monitoring its course, attending labour and delivery, following the new mother for up to 28 days after birth, assisting with breast feeding, neonatal care and so on.

Medspeak-US
A formally trained person, often an advanced practice registered nurse, who assists in childbirth; midwifery is undergoing a resurgence in popularity in the US, as it provides obstetric services for lower-income women and is a delivery option chosen by some upper-income women who desire a greater involvement in childbirth.

midwife

Obstetrics A trained person, often an advanced practice registered nurse, who assists in childbirth or, in many situations, is the primary provider of obstetric care Salary $66K + 9% bonus. See Alternative birthing center, Alternative gynecology, Certified nurse midwife, Doula, Granny midwife, Lay midwife, Natural childbirth; Cf Lamaze technique.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf)
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.
See also: doula

midwife,

n a woman who attends another woman during pregnancy and labor, an expert practitioner in the care of expectant women and the delivery of uncomplicated pregnancies.

mid·wife

(mid'wīf)
A person qualified to practice midwifery, having received specialized training in obstetrics and child care.

midwife,

n 1. in traditional use, a (female) person who assists women in childbirth.
2. a nurse practitioner trained and experienced in assisting women in childbirth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The meetings also provide an opportunity to organise second midwife back-up or talk about wider practice issues, such as the clinic environment and shared purchases for the practice facilities.
That can make it difficult for the maternity unit to find a second midwife, Cathy says.
The midwife who was supposed to be the woman's maternity carer was advised to take undergo more training on informed consent, recordkeeping and observing professional boundaries.
It should be made easier for people who had trained as both nurse and midwife to maintain their dual registration, Grabowski said.
of pals " David says his decision to become a midwife wasn't influenced by the births of his children Donna, now 30, and Paul, 26
The midwife model allows greater time for teaching and can follow a woman throughout her life, a model of comprehensive care, according to Ms.
To become a preceptor, you must have an additional 3 years' experience or 50 births as the primary midwife.
ON CALL: Midwives from Calderdale Royal Hospital's labour and delivery unit, above, and below, from left: Gina Augarde tries out a birthing ball; Michelle Nolan, from Brackenhall, with baby Ava and Community midwives Kate Large and Heather Irving invite shoppers to attend International Day of the Midwife at Huddersfield Town Hall
We need to see the positive steps continue, and the negative trends such as the drop in midwife numbers addressed urgently.
A survey of 463 newly-qualified midwives and 186 final-year students found 52% "strongly agreed" they were finding it difficult to get a job as a midwife.
The 'Capacity Placement of International United Nations Volunteer Midwives project in South Sudan' started in December 2010, when the first IUNV midwife was deployed to Juba Teaching Hospital.
Midwife graduate Victoria Graham, 24, of Longbenton, Newcastle, said: "I think the findings need to be taken cautiously as I personally have not experienced that there is any shortage of midwives in the region.