midtarsal joint

trans·verse tar·sal joint

[TA]
the complex joint formed by the synovial joints between the talus and navicular bone medially and the calcaneus and navicular bones laterally that act as a unit in allowing the front of the foot to pivot relative to the back of the foot about the longitudinal axis of the foot, contributing to the total inversion and eversion movements.

midtarsal joint

; MTJ complex formed by talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints, located at apex of longitudinal arch of foot (see Table 1 and Table 2); permits supination and pronation of rearfoot on midfoot
Table 1: Joint axes of rotation within the foot
Joint (axis orientation)Primary movement about axis of rotationOrientation of axis of rotation to body planes
HorizontalFrontalSagittal
Ankle (lateral/plantar/posterior to medial/dorsal/anterior)Dorsiflexion; plantarflexion85°
Subtalar (lateral/plantar/posterior to medial/dorsal/anterior)Supination; pronation42°48°16°
Midtarsal (lateral/plantar/posterior to medial/dorsal/anterior)Oblique axis
Supination; pronation
52°57°
Longitudinal axis
Inversion; eversion
15°
First ray (medial/plantar/posterior to lateral/dorsal/anterior)Dorsiflexion with inversion; plantarflexion with eversion12°45°45°
Fifth ray (lateral/plantar/posterior to medial/dorsal/anterior)Dorsiflexion with eversion; plantarflexion with inversion20°55°70°
Table 2: Movements occurring about the joints of the lower limb and foot
Movement about jointMuscle causing the movementNerve supply to muscle
Hip flexionIliacus
Psoas major
Rectus femoris
Sartorius
Tensor fasciae lata
Pectineus
Adductor longus
Adductor brevis
Ventral rami of L1 and L2
Ventral rami of L1 and L2
Femoral
Femoral
Superior gluteal
Femoral
Obturator
Obturator
Hip extensionGluteus maximus
Semimembranosus
Semitendinosus
Biceps femoris, long head
Adductor magnus, ischial part
Inferior gluteal
Tibial part of sciatic nerve
Tibial part of sciatic nerve
Tibial part of sciatic nerve
Tibial part of sciatic nerve
Hip adductionAdductor longus
Adductor brevis
Adductor magnus
Gracilis
Pectineus
Quadratus femoris
Obturator
Obturator
Obturator
Obturator
Femoral
Ventral rami of L4, L5 and S1
Hip abductionGluteus medius
Gluteus minimus
Tensor fasciae lata
Piriformis
Obturator internus, in flexion
Superior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Ventral rami of L5 and SI
Ventral rami of L5 and S1
Medial rotation of leg at hipTensor fasciae lata
Gluteus minimus
Anterior fibres of gluteus maximus
Adductors longus, brevis and magnus
Iliopsoas
Superior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Ventral rami L1 and L2
Lateral rotation of leg at hipSartorius
Gluteus maximus
Obturator internus
Gemelli
Obturator externus
Quadratus femoris
Piriformis, in flexion
Femoral
Inferior gluteal
Ventral rami of L5, S1 and S2
Ventral rami of L5, S1 and S2
Obturator
Ventral rami of L4, L5 and S1 Ventral rami of L5, S1 and S2
Knee flexionSemimembranosus
Semitendinosus
Biceps femoris, long head
Biceps femoris, short head
Gracilis
Sartorius
Popliteus
Gastrocnemius
Sciatic (tibial)
Sciatic (tibial)
Sciatic (tibial)
Common peroneal
Obturator
Femoral
Tibial
Tibial
Knee extensionVastus medialis
Vastus lateralis
Vastus intermedius
Rectus femoris
Gluteus maximus
Tensor fasciae lata
Femoral
Femoral
Femoral
Femoral
Inferior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Lateral rotation of leg = medial rotation of thigh in knee flexionBiceps femoris, long head
Biceps femoris, short head
Gluteus maximus
Tensor fasciae lata
Tibial
Common peroneal
Inferior gluteal
Superior gluteal
Medial rotation of leg with knee flexedPopliteusTibial
Medial rotation of leg with knee extendedSemimembranosus
Semitendinosus
Gracilis
Sartorius
Sciatic (tibial)
Sciatic (tibial)
Obturator
Femoral
Ankle plantarflexionGastrocnemius
Soleus
Plantaris
Tibialis posterior
Flexor hallucis longus
Flexor digitorum longus
Peroneus longus
Peroneus brevis
Tibial
Tibial
Tibial
Tibial
Tibial
Tibial
Superficial peroneal
Superficial peroneal
Ankle dorsiflexionTibialis anterior
Extensor hallucis longus
Extensor digitorum longus
Peroneus tertius
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
Subtalar and midtarsal inversionTibialis anterior
Extensor hallucis longus
Tibialis posterior
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
Tibial
Subtalar and midtarsal eversionPeroneus longus
Peroneus brevis
Extensor digitorum longus
Peroneus tertius
Superficial peroneal
Superficial peroneal
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
1 Toe plantarflexion (MTPJ; IPJ)Flexor hallucis longus
Flexor hallucis brevis
Tibial
Medial plantar
2-5 Toes plantarflexion (MTPJs; IPJs)Flexor digitorum longus
Flexor accessorius (quadratus plantae)
Flexor digitorum brevis
Lumbricals
Interossei
Tibial
Lateral plantar
Medial plantar
Medial plantar, toe 2; lateral plantar toes 3-5
Lateral plantar
1 Toe dorsiflexionExtensor hallucis longus
Extensor hallucis brevis
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
2-5 Toes dorsiflexion
2-4 Toes dorsiflexion
Extensor digitorum longus
Extensor digitorum brevis
Deep peroneal
Deep peroneal
Toe abduction (away from midline of foot = adduction toward midline of body)
Toe 1
Toes 2-4
Toe 5
Abductor hallucis
Dorsal interossei
Abductor digit minimi
Medial plantar
Lateral plantar
Lateral plantar
Toe adduction (toward the midline of foot = abduction away from midline of body)
Toe 1
Toes 2-5
Adductor hallucis*
Plantar interossei
Lateral plantar
Lateral plantar

Note: Primary action of muscles is printed in normal type; muscles that give some contribution to this action are printed in italics .

The nerve supply to the lower limb (lower leg and foot) is derived from the sciatic and femoral nerves. Dysfunction or compromise of either of these nerves causes marked motor, sensory and autonomic effects in the lower leg and foot.

MTPJ, metatarsophalangeal joint; IPJ, interphalangeal joint.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kite abducted the foot at midtarsal joint with thumb pressing on the lateral side of the calcaneo-cuboid joint.
If the midtarsal joint is flexible, it is generally agreed that gentle forces should be applied to orientate the forefoot so that the plane of the metatarsal heads are perpendicular to the vertical bisector of the calcaneus [5].
In producing more subtalar joint eversion, caused by the proximity of the midtarsal joint to the forces, the forefoot tended to evert at a higher degree than the subtalar joint.
This is thought to lock the midtarsal joint and reduce any movement extraneous to the ankle joint (3).
Once the ankle is restricted, the midtarsal joint is the next joint through which dorsilexion may occur.
Simultaneously there is supination in the oblique midtarsal joints as well as pronation in the longitudinal midtarsal joint axis, moving the first ray into plantar flexion.
Mark Davies, the Welsh team's physiotherapist, suspects Charvis has suffered soft tissue damage around the midtarsal joint in his foot, rather than a break.
Then pressure is focused upon the plantar aspect of the fifth MTP joint to both lock the midtarsal joint (eliminating noise) and passively maximally dorsiflex the foot till end-feel.
Among the foot cases, midtarsal joints were frequently involved, while in a large series of foot and ankle tuberculosis, Calcaneus was involved frequently, followed by midtarsal joints.
These modifications are made in an attempt to improve the effectiveness of the subtalar and midtarsal joints and to minimize stresses directed on the lower extremity soft tissues (Genova & Gross, 2000).
The laxity in the joint capsule and ligaments of the subtalar and midtarsal joints is usually caused by inflammation and swelling.
Someone would have had to have known a lot about foot anatomy," he says of the tracks, which contained evidence of dermal ridges and midtarsal joints.