middle-ear effusion

middle-ear effusion

a condition in which the air in the middle ear has been replaced with serous or mucoid fluid as a consequence of otitis media.

mid·dle-ear ef·fu·sion

(mid'dĕl-ēr ĕ-fyū'zhŭn)
A condition in which the air in the middle ear has been replaced with serous or mucoid fluid as a consequence of otitis media.
Synonym(s): serous otitis media.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic otitis, conductive hearing loss because of chronic middle-ear effusion or impacted cerumen, and enlarged tonsils can result in obstructive sleep apnea.
A study by Post (15) showed the presence of pathogens attached to the middle-ear mucosa as a bacterial biofilm rather than as free-floating organisms in a middle-ear effusion.
They emphasize the diagnostic criteria, and strengthen the significance of bulging as a diagnostic requirement for AOM as well as the requirement for the presence of middle-ear effusion.
Erythema of the tympanic membrane without a middle-ear effusion is called acute myringitis, often mistaken for AOM.
children 6 to 24 months old with a certain diagnosis of AOM (rapid onset, signs of middle-ear effusion, and signs and symptoms of middle-ear inflammation) or severe illness (moderate to severe otalgia or fever _102.
The abbreviated definition of AOM is "the presence of middle-ear effusion in conjunction with the rapid onset of one or more signs or symptoms of inflammation of the middle ear.
Many parents and clinicians believe that there is a significant risk of permanent harm if tympanostomy tubes are not promptly inserted for children with persistent middle-ear effusion.
Clinical success was defined as the lessening or complete resolution of acute ear infection and inflammation, with or without middle-ear effusion, to the extent that no additional antibiotics were needed.
The trial started when there were serious concerns in the USA--but no real evidence--that persistent middle-ear effusion could cause irreversible damage to a child's ability to learn.
They were also given an antihistamine, although this class of drugs was shown to be ineffective more than 20 years ago and were recently shown to extend the duration of middle-ear effusion.
The study, which first identified infants for enrollment, involved 429 children who had persistent, bilateral, middle-ear effusion for 90 days or unilateral effusion for 135 days and who were randomized either to immediate tube placement or to placement after 6-9 months if necessary.