middle ear

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middle ear

the tympanic cavity with the auditory ossicles contained in an irregular space in the temporal bone. It is separated from the external ear by the tympanic membrane and from the inner ear by the oval window. The auditory (eustachian) tube carries air from the posterior nasopharynx into the middle ear. Also called tympanic cavity. Compare external ear, internal ear.
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Middle ear

middle ear

The middle of the three parts of the ear, consisting of an air-filled cavity bound externally by the tympanic membrane and containing three ossicles that vibrate in response to sound waves, passing the amplified sound to the inner ear at the round window.

tym·pan·ic cav·i·ty

(tim-pan'ik kav'i-tē) [TA]
An air chamber in the temporal bone containing the ossicles; it is lined with mucous membrane and is continuous with the auditory tube anteriorly and the tympanic antrum and mastoid air cells posteriorly.

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
The organ of hearing: composed of the external ear, which includes the auricle and the external acoustic, or auditory, meatus; the middle ear, or the tympanic cavity with its ossicles; and the internal ear or inner ear, or labyrinth, which includes the semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea.
See also: auricle
Synonym(s): auris [TA] .

middle ear

The narrow cleft within the temporal bone lying between the inside of the ear drum and the outer wall of the inner ear. The middle ear is lined with mucous membrane, contains the chain of three auditory OSSICLES and is drained into the back of the nose by the EUSTACHIAN TUBE. It is a common site of infection, which gains access by way of the tube. Middle ear infection is called OTITIS MEDIA. Also known as the tympanic cavity.

middle ear

see EAR.

Middle ear

The cavity or space between the eardrum and the inner ear. It includes the eardrum, the three little bones (hammer, anvil, and stirrup) that transmit sound to the inner ear, and the eustachian tube, which connects the inner ear to the nasopharynx (the back of the nose).

EAR

Abbreviation for estimated average requirement.

ear

(ēr) [TA]
Organ of hearing and equilibrium, composed of external ear,, consisting of auricle, external acoustic meatus, and tympanic membrane; middle ear,, or tympanic cavity, with its auditory ossicles and associated muscles; and internal ear,, the vestibulocochlear organ, which includes the bony labyrinth (of semicircular canals, vestibule, and cochlea), and vestibular and cochlear labyrinths.
Synonym(s): auris.

middle ear

see ear, otitis media.

middle ear cavity
cavity of the middle ear made up of the tympanic bulla and the epitympanic recess.
middle ear ossicles
see ossicle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of an endoscope to examine the middle ear cavity was described by Mer in 1967.
There may be associated extension into the IAC or middle ear cavity.
A temporal bone computed tomography scan without contrast was done which showed soft-tissue thickening and fluid in the middle ear cavity along the external auditory canal on the right side (Figure-3 and 4).
Some final advice: after treatment of a middle ear infection, it is normal and expected for the fluid to remain in the middle ear cavity for weeks or even months, which does not usually require any treatment.
Some children persistently retain fluid in the middle ear cavity for weeks, months, or everyears.
4) HRCT helps in evaluating the disorders that primarily affects middle ear cavity, air cells and bony details.
Intraoperatively, some granulation tissue over the middle ear cavity was found, and as much as possible was removed.
Middle ear cavity was cleared of granulations and polypoidal tissues if any.
A cadaveric study was performed to test the hypothesis that intact-canal-wall mastoidectomy (ICWM) with otoendoscopy allows for equal or better visualization of the middle ear cavity structures when compared with canal-wall-down mastoidectomy (CWDM) with microscopy.
Live insects in the external auditory canal should be first killed by putting oil, 2% xylocaine drops or water in external auditory canal and then only removed, most of the foreign bodies can be removed without anaesthesia, however in uncooperative children or an impacted foreign body, should be removed under general anaesthesia using microscope or otoendoscope to avoid damage to ear drum and pushing the foreign body in to the middle ear cavity, which makes ultimate removal of the object more difficult.
Since then, published data have shown that virtual endoscopy can reveal the anatomy of structures of the middle ear cavity in excellent detail and that it may serve as a useful complement to conventional CT.
MRI brain done 11 days after CT scan showed left CSOM with complete opacification of the mastoid and middle ear cavity with fluid and granulation tissue.