microvascular disease


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microvascular disease

See Diabetic microangiopathy.

microvascular disease

pathological changes in arterioles and capillaries causing relative ischaemia of skin, renal and retinal tissues, the vasa nervosum and vasa vasorum; characteristic of diabetes mellitus
References in periodicals archive ?
Microvascular disease or cardiovascular disease are 1 point each.
Intensive glycemia treatment had no effect on 2 composite outcomes for advanced microvascular disease, namely: (a) dialysis or renal transplantation, serum creatinine >292 [micro]mol/L (>3.
In contrast, this report suggests that the use of an osteo-myocuteanous flap may result in effective wound healing following limited digital amputation in the setting of diabetic microvascular disease, presumably due to increased vascularity at the wound site.
Oxidative stress, inflammation, and immune system activation are all likely associated with microvascular disease, they add, and have also all been linked to major depression.
But women with coronary artery disease often complain of different symptoms from men and show clinical differences as well, with damage more often occurring in smaller blood vessels with fewer arterial blockages, a condition called microvascular disease.
These types of damage are the result of damage to small vessels, referred to as microvascular disease.
Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a microvascular disease, is characterised by loss of myelinated nerve fibres, degeneration, and blunted nerve fibre reproduction.
Secondary to the effects of glucotoxicity, lipotoxicity, and barotoxicity, patients with DM experience significant escalation in risk for atherosclerotic disease and its clinical sequelae (eg, myocardial infarction, stroke, sudden death) as well as for microvascular disease (eg, proliferative retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy).
In a second poster at the meeting, diabetic macrovascular and microvascular disease during pregnancy was associated with reduced intrauterine fetal growth among 358 women with type 1 diabetes enrolled in a "Diabetes in Pregnancy" program at the University of Cincinnati.
As is often the case, and occurred in the case presented herein, there were no obvious infectious sources, predisposing factors of diabetes, immunodeficiency, or microvascular disease.
In relation to type 1 diabetes, they found that BMI did not appear an independent risk factor for chronic complications associated with microvascular disease, and the impact of BMI on cardiovascular risk appeared to be stronger for men than women.