microtrauma


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microtrauma

 [mi″kro-traw´mah]
a microscopic lesion or injury.

microtrauma

[-trô′mə]
a very slight injury or lesion.

microtrauma

Small, often minute injuries caused by repetitive overuse.

microtrauma

Orthopedics Small, usually unnoticed injuries caused by repetitive overuse. See Overuse syndrome.

mi·cro·trau·ma

(mī'krō-traw'mă)
A minor or microscopic lesion due to injury, which may become significant if often repeated.
Synonym(s): cumulative trauma disorder.

cu·mu·la·tive trau·ma dis·or·der

(CTD) (kyūm'yŭ-lă-tiv traw'mă dis-ōr'dĕr)
Any of the chronic disorders involving tendon, muscle, joint, and nerve damage, often resulting from work-related physical activities.
Synonym(s): microtrauma, repetitive strain disorder.

microtrauma

a microscopic lesion or injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Degeneration can also result from repetitive microtrauma to the knee, which can occur in sporting activities and which results in patellar tendonitis or "jumper's knee.
17) However, microtrauma may cause an increase in production of Type III collagen, (1) which predisposes the tendon to rupture due to its decreased ability to resist tensile forces.
These stresses lead to microtrauma in the soft tissues surrounding the shoulder and, with repetitive throwing, can result in overuse injuries.
As discussed in Part 1 of this review, internal impingement is thought by many to be a result of anterior instablity caused by repetitive microtrauma to anterior shoulder structures and secondary loss of effective dynamic stabilizing function.
Whereas, a chronic injury was defined as a gradual onset injury caused by repeated microtrauma without a single, identifiable event responsible for the injury (Smoljanovic et al.
It typically arises from repetitive microtrauma to the plantar fascia; a thick aponeurotic tissue that extends from the medial tubercle of the calcaneus to the proximal phalanges of the toes.
The second theory posits that repeated microtrauma causes degeneration of the arterial adventitia, resulting in cyst formation.
22-24) Further exacerbating this ischemia is the simple volume loss due to sweat, the mechanical damage from the microtrauma of running, as well as thermal insult from rising body temperatures that all combine to worsen the mucosal damage occurring in the gut lining.
Tendons and ligaments are some of the strongest connective tissues of the body, and as such, are subject to common overuse injuries from cumulative microtrauma.
PSS is characterized by the calcification and ossification of the medial collateral ligament (MCL), usually associated with a history of direct or indirect trauma and repetitive microtrauma (3-6).
The authors suggest that this may related to lateral epicondylitis being caused by repeated microtrauma rather than inflammation (perhaps this is why NSAIDs are not always beneficial either).
1-3) Prevention depends on eliminating sources of repeated microtrauma.