microthrombus

(redirected from microthrombi)

microthrombus

[mī′krōthrom′bəs] pl. microthrombi
Etymology: Gk, mikros, small + thrombos, lump
a small thrombus located in a capillary or other small blood vessel.

microthrombus

(mī″krō-thrŏm′bŭs) [″ + ″]
A microscopic clump of fibrin, platelets, and red blood cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, there were abundant fibrin microthrombi within the hepatic sinusoids.
3) Side branch occlusions, distal embolization of plaques disrupted by the balloon or stent, platelet-rich microthrombi, vasospasm, and transient ischemia due to balloon inflation are among the proposed mechanisms.
These microthrombi disseminate and result in vascular occlusion, tissue ischemia, and end-organ damage.
Multiple vessels demonstrated fibrinoid necrosis of the vascular wall and microthrombi due to extensive neutrophilic vasculitis (Fig.
Most of the time, microthrombi develop rather than macrothrombi and clinical findings may be absent without organ failure.
Vasculitis and microthrombi formation with eventual intravascular coagulation and spreading necrosis are characteristic pathophysiological features of the infection and present clinically with quickly spreading erythema, severe pain, systemic toxicity and blistering of the skin.
TTP is a potentially lethal condition which occurs when ultra-large Von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers cause platelet microthrombi in arterioles and capillaries.
Coagulation activation and the formation of microthrombi promote further ischemic insult (Yenari, Kitagawa, Leyden, & Perez-Pinzon, 2008).
2] gradient, likely by means of pulmonary vasoconstriction, microthrombi, and/or endothelial swelling.
Disseminated intravascular coagulation, defined as capillary microthrombi occurring in 2 or more organs, occurred in twothirds of CM cases that had extravascular pathologic signs.
In cryoglobulinemia, a histologic examination of kidney biopsies usually reveals glomerular infiltration by activated macrophages and intraluminal microthrombi (cryoprecipitates) in vessels; immunofluorescence or electron microscopy analysis may reveal subendothelial deposits of IgM, IgG, and complement (2).
formation of microthrombi leading to cerebral infarction and renal failure