microsurgery


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microsurgery

 [mi″kro-ser´jer-e]
dissection of minute structures under the microscope with the use of extremely small instruments. With increasingly sophisticated operating microscopes surgeons are able to perform tissue transfers without the cumbersome standard transfer procedures, such as the tubed pedicle graft and cross-leg flap, that were once necessary to ensure adequate blood supply to the grafted part. Microvascular surgery permits anastomosis of peripheral blood vessels less than 2 mm in diameter. Similarly, microneural techniques allow the surgeon to reestablish sensation by repairing or replacing severed and damaged peripheral nerves. Because of the advances in microsurgery, it is possible to reattach amputated parts, provided the health status of the patient and the condition of the amputated part are favorable.

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē),
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery

/mi·cro·sur·gery/ (-sur´jĕ-re) dissection of minute structures under the microscope by means of hand-held instruments.microsur´gical

microsurgery

[-sur′jərē]
Etymology: Gk, mikros, small, cheirourgos, surgery
surgery that involves dissection and manipulation of minute tissue structures under a microscope.

microsurgery

A surgical procedure performed with the aid of a low-power (7x to 15x) operating microscope, using special equipment, surgical thread, clamps, and scalpels, to repair severed blood vessels, nerves or other structures. While it is primarily used in plastic surgery, microsurgical techniques are being incorporated into most other fields of surgery and may become linked with robotic surgery.

microsurgery

Surgery A surgical procedure performed with the aid of a low-power–7x to 15x microscope, using special equipment, surgical thread, clamps, scalpels, to repair severed blood vessels or nerves or other structures. See Free flap microsurgery, Laryngeal microsurgery.

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery

Surgery in which the operation field is magnified 2 to about 40 times by means of an operating microscope. Appropriately miniaturized operating instruments are used. This method allows a high degree of precision in the cutting, approximation and stitching (suturing) of small parts and is widely used by ophthalmologists, ENT surgeons and vascular surgeons. To a lesser extent, microsurgery is employed in gynaecology and urology.

Microsurgery

Surgery on small body structures or cells performed with the aid of a microscope and other specialized instruments.
Mentioned in: General Surgery

larval therapy

; microsurgery treatment of chronically infected (including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA]), heavily sloughed or necrotic wounds by application of sterile greenbottle fly maggots (Lucilia sericata ); maggots reduce wound pain and odour (by ingesting necrotic and infected tissue) and promote wound healing (by altering wound pH, secreting antimicrobial substances and promoting growth factor release)

mi·cro·sur·ger·y

(mī'krō-sŭr'jĕr-ē)
Surgical procedures performed under the magnification of a surgical microscope.

microsurgery,

n surgery that involves microdissection and micromanipulation of tissues, usually accomplished with the aid of a binocular microscopic instrument.

microsurgery

dissection of minute structures under the microscope, with the use of extremely small instruments.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Alwadi said he was able to recover quickly because of the microsurgery, followed by physiotherapy and that his hand's range of motion was fully restored.
In an operation to reattach a severed limb or digit, microsurgery is used to repair nerves and blood vessels.
The microsurgery techniques available today (and developed, in large part, at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell) have a very low complication and failure rate compared with the more invasive techniques used in the past.
It will be the world's first mobile microsurgery class, added Demirkan.
He said the Jinnah medical staff were now gaining invaluable experience in microsurgery.
Previously, cells had been developed in a two-dimensional laboratory dish, but the Melbourne scientists use a chamber - essentially an empty box - to implant a blood vessel using microsurgery, The Australian reports.
The last two incisions let the tiny surgical instruments enter the body and perform the "blood and guts" of microsurgery.
But doctors used pioneering microsurgery to replace them with two of her toes.
Surgeons worked for eight hours to sew the fingers back on by microsurgery, but it will be six weeks before Steve knows whether he'll recover the use of his fingers.
For Mills, drawing is a kind of remote microsurgery in which a child sutures his wounds, stitching closed their lips in patterns that retrace, and so speak, the shape and character of their origin in the family.
The leech, a type of bloodsucking worm applied to the patient from ancient times through the late 19th century to "treat" local inflammations and then largely abandoned as a therapeutic tool, recently made a comeback in medicine, especially because anticoagulants it secretes aid the drainage of small blood vessels, preventing clots during delicate microsurgery.
Through continuous improvement and development of our people, our mission is to design, manufacture and market innovative microsurgical instruments and consumables of the highest quality in order to assist and enable surgeons who perform microsurgery around the world to provide a better quality of life for their patients.