microsomal ethanol oxidizing system


Also found in: Wikipedia.

microsomal ethanol oxidizing system

(mī″krō-sōm′āl),

MEOS

A hepatic enzyme system that catabolizes drugs and other potentially toxic substances. Ethanol ingested in relatively small amounts is catabolized by the hepatic enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase. Whenever ingested amounts of ethanol are large enough to overcome or deplete the alcohol dehydrogenase system, the MEOS becomes the major route for ethanol catabolism. Ethanol breakdown by the MEOS is not thought to produce as much energy as alcohol dehydrogenase breakdown, resulting in less weight gain than would be expected from the ethanol calories consumed.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS), which is generated by hepatocytes and hepatic enzymes including CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A, is an alternate pathway for ethanol metabolism (Lieber 1999; Garcia-Banuelos et al.
Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), a protein that is part of the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) and is involved in alcohol metabolism primarily after chronic alcohol consumption.
In addition to being oxidized by ADH, ethanol also can be metabolized by the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS), whose key component is CYP2E1.
The P450-dependent oxidation of alcohol was first identified as the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system (MEOS) and was shown to involve the activity of primarily one form of P450, now known as CYP2E1 (Koop and Coon 1986; Lieber 2004).
Respective roles of human cytochrome P-4502E1, 1A2 and 3A4 in the hepatic microsomal ethanol oxidizing system.