microsleep


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microsleep

(mī′krə-slēp′)
n.
A period of sleep that lasts up to a few seconds, usually experienced by people who have narcolepsy or are severely deprived of sleep.
A brief episode of sleep of precipitous onset, lasting from a fraction of a second to 30 seconds. It occurs in night-shift fatigue, and is associated with excess daytime sleepiness and automatic behaviour
Aetiology Sleep deprivation, mental fatigue, sleep apnea, hypoxia, narcolepsy, or hypersomnia

microsleep

Nodding Sleep disorders A brief episode of sleep lasting a few secs, which occurs in night-shift fatigue; it is associated with excess daytime sleepiness and automatic behavior. See Circadian rhythm, Libby Zion, Night-shift fatigue, Sleep disorders.
References in periodicals archive ?
They have discovered that most people frequently and repeatedly enter into short microsleep periods, which are clearly indicated by their brain waves but of which they themselves are totally unaware.
Polysomnographic monitoring electrodes, which indicate when a subject exhibits microsleep (1- to 15-second episodes of Stage 1, or first-level sleep), were applied to all the subjects at the beginning of the study and remained on continuously for the entire study period.
LDW helps to combat dangerous phenomena such as microsleep or driver distraction which might cause a vehicle to unintentionally stray into oncoming traffic.
And then there are recently recognized scientific elements like sleep apnea, microsleep, circadian rhythms, and so forth.
com PERFECT FOR POWER NAPS Persuade your boss that workplace snoozing is a good thing by using this tie to take performance-boosting microsleeps at your desk.
Strauss tells us fatigue first manifests itself by errors of omission (forgetting to do things), followed by errors of commission (doing things wrong, or doing the wrong things), followed by involuntary microsleeps (sleep lapses lasting from a few seconds to a few minutes).
As the pressure for sleep increases, the brain will unpredictably try to insert snatches of sleep: lapses or microsleeps.
The findings coincide with a new series of Department for Transport (Df T) radio advertisements alerting drivers to the dangers of microsleeps.
This explanation would be consistent with the concept of microsleeps, in which the brain stops processing information, even though the eyes may still be open.
The FAST program will accept all the above information (except medication effects) and produce plots of expected levels of cognitive performance, including a numerical assessment of the predicted effectiveness of the mishap member and propensity for lapses or microsleeps at the time of the mishap.
We are unlikely to know we have slept unless it lasts at least two minutes, and microsleeps of a few seconds are common -even among airline pilots while flying a plane.
Fatigue and microsleeps while motoring are often the cause of serious accidents.