microlivestock

microlivestock

Animals (e.g., cows, pigs, sheep) that are much smaller than standard breeds of livestock, which adapt to various environments, breed easily and survive on diverse or marginal food supplies (such as garbage).
References in periodicals archive ?
Goats are considered small livestock animals compared to bigger animals such as cattle camels and horses but larger than microlivestock such as poultry rabbits cavies and bees.
have potential for increase microlivestock production, since they represent the main protein sources for local populations (Bonaudo et al.
Breeding microlivestock - smaller animals not traditionally used as livestock - could be the solution.
Microlivestock are important because the developing world's animal production is only a fraction of what it should be.
However, much of the world's surface is unsuitable for permanent cultivation, and it is in these areas and for those people who have no access to arable lands that a convincing case for microlivestock can most easily be made.
Like chickens, rabbits exemplify the vast possibilities that microlivestock offer for increasing meat production in the most poverty-stricken parts of the world.
Several species of tiny deer - smaller than many dogs - might make useful microlivestock, although much research is needed before their true potential can be judged.
Mouse deer and musk deer (which, strictly speaking, are not true deer at all) are of microlivestock size and are also possible future livestock.
For instance, microlivestock lend themselves to economic niches that are not easily filled by large livestock.
Another advantage of microlivestock is that they can be raised where conventional livestock cannot.
Some microlivestock can produce under conditions where conventional species die.
Raising microlivestock is not a panacea for the Third World's food problems.