microglia

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Related to microglial: Astrocytes, Oligodendrocytes

microglia

 [mi-krog´le-ah]
non-neural cells forming part of the adventitial structure of the central nervous system. They are migratory and act as phagocytes of waste products of the nervous system. adj., adj microg´lial.

mi·crog·li·a

(mī-krog'lē-ă), This word is grammatically singular. Avoid the mispronunciation microgli'a.
Small neuroglial cells of the central nervous system, originating in the bone marrow, that may become phagocytic in areas of neural damage or inflammation.
[micro- + G. glia, glue]

microglia

/mi·crog·lia/ (mi-krog´le-ah) small nonneural cells forming part of the supporting structure of the central nervous system. They are migratory and act as phagocytes to waste products of nerve tissue.microg´lial
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Microglia.

microglia

(mī′krō-glē′ə, -glī′-)
n.
(used with a pl. verb) Any of the small neuroglial cells of the central nervous system having long processes and amoeboid and phagocytic activity at sites of neural damage or inflammation.

microglia

[mīkrog′lē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, mikros + glia, glue
small, migratory interstitial cells that form part of the central nervous system. They have various forms and slender, branched processes. Microglia serve as phagocytes that collect waste products of the nerve tissue of the body. Also called Hortega cells, mesoglia.
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Microglia

microglial cell

A perivascular bone-marrow-derived cell native to the CNS, belonging to the mononuclear phagocytic system (e.g., monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes), which presents antigens in an MHC-class-II restricted context.

mi·crog·li·a

(mī-krog'lē-ă)
Small neuroglial cells, possibly of mesodermal origin, which may become phagocytic, in areas of neural damage or inflammation.
Synonym(s): Hortega cells.
[micro- + G. glia, glue]
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MICROGLIA

microglia

(mi-krog'le-a) [? + glia, glue]
Cells of the central nervous system (CNS) present between neurons or next to capillaries. These cells may function as macrophages when they migrate to damaged CNS tissue.
See: gitter cell; illustration

microglia

Neurological connective tissue MACROPHAGES. Compare MACROGLIA.

Hortega,

Pio del Rio, Spanish neurohistologist in South America, 1882-1945.
Hortega cells - small neuroglial cells that may become phagocytic in areas of neural damage or inflammation. Synonym(s): microglia
Hortega neuroglia stain - one of several silver carbonate methods to demonstrate astrocytes, oligodendroglia, and microglia.

microglia

scavenging reticuloendothelial cells within nerve tissue

microglia

non-neural cells forming part of the adventitial structure of the central nervous system. They are migratory and act as phagocytes of waste products of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
In MS, specific immunostaining was restricted to short linear deposits of activated complement (C3d) on partly demyelinated axons located within unusual microglial nodules in normal-appearing periplaque white matter (Figure 2).
Percent of field analysis was used to provide a quantitative estimate (proportional area) of changes in the activation state of microglial cells [2,10,12-13] in dorsal horn laminae I to IV based on atlas boundaries, after subtraction of background signal.
Dalesconols B inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation and suppresses NF-[kappa]B and p38/JNK activation in microglial cells.
Cyclic ADP-ribose is a second messenger in the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activation of murine N9 microglial cell line.
The evidence for immune activation was most prominent in the anterior cingulate cortex, a brain region involved in mood regulation and implicated in the biological origin of depression, confirming the results of a previous study that first identified altered microglial activation in medication-free MDD patients.
In addition, we used Iba-1 as the microglial marker, and confirmed the expression of CX3CR1 (green) in microglia (red) within the CSF-contacting nucleus (Figure 2D-F), which has been extensively reported (17,18).
Luteolin protects dopaminergic neurons from inflammation-induced injury through inhibition of microglial activation.
In brain,theincreased microglial cells resulted into the formation of microglial nodules, while in lungs alveolar septa was widened with increased infiltration of the inflammatory cells including macrophages.
Extracellular ATP stimulates microglial P2 receptors to evoke various cellular responses such as the production of cytokines and neurotrophic factors.
Activated microglial cells and HLA-DR-positive macrophages were identified throughout most of the gray and white matter of the cerebrum.
However, it has multiple neuroprotective effects by being an antioxidant, protecting mitochondrial integrity, and modulating the immune system, as well as attenuating microglial activation, which triggers neuroinflammation and oxidative stress.
The objectives of this study were to determine a) the deposition and retention of Ag in the nasal cavity following inhalation exposure; b) the timing for Ag translocation and retention/clearance in the OB; and c) whether the presence of Ag in the OB affects the activity of microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the OB and the brain.