microflora


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microflora

 [mi´kro-flor″ah]
bacteria present in the large intestine.

mi·cro·flo·ra

(mī'krō-flō'ră),
The bacteria and fungi that inhabit an area.

microflora

/mi·cro·flo·ra/ (-flor´ah) the microscopic vegetable organisms of a special region.

microflora

The constellation of microorganisms which are found on or in, or characteristic of, a special location of a host organism or the environment.

mi·cro·flo·ra

(mī'krō-flōr'ă)
The bacteria and fungi that inhabit an area.

microflora

the community of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi and algae, that live in a particular habitat or in or on another living organism.

Microflora

The bacterial population in the intestine.
Mentioned in: Gastroenteritis

microflora

; indiginous commensal flora population of diverse microorganisms (MOs) colonizing the outer surface of normal skin; may contain populations of pathogenic microorganisms, e.g. meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); microflora do not pose a threat to the individual under normal circumstances, and do not cause infection, but if one MO strain becomes paramount, or if host resistance is reduced, or the epithelial surface broken, infection may supervene

mi·cro·flo·ra

(mī'krō-flōr'ă)
Bacteria and fungi that inhabit an environment.

microflora,

n a group or colony of microorganisms present in a specific, localized location.

microflora

living microorganisms that are so small that they can be seen only with a microscope and that maintain a more or less constant presence in a particular area, e.g. the pharynx or the rumen. Includes bacteria, viruses, protozoa, fungi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clustering and follow- up biological analysis of OTU for sequences are usually made under the similar level of 97% to reveal the dominant microflora in naturally fermented cabbage of northeastern part of China and microflora changes in fermented cabbage of the provinces of different latitudes, laying the foundation for the exploration of the evolution of microflora diversity.
cerevisiae at Winery 1 may help explain the rapid commencement of fermentations there, as winery microflora would be well adapted to the environment, and S.
We did not identify pathogenic microflora in vaginal smears of animals of the experimental and control groups.
Synthetic Biologics is developing SYN-004, a novel second generation oral enzyme drug candidate, to be co- administered with commonly used IV beta-lactam antibiotics and is intended to protect the gastrointestinal microflora (microbiome) from the harmful effects of such antibiotics, thus potentially preventing C.
Perhaps when speaking about these symptoms we face the diseases caused by association of viruses with various representatives of pathogenic microflora of the urogenital tract.
Colonization resistance of barrier microflora in carcinogenesis and allergic patients.
Fortunately polyolefins are bioinert but their oxidation products are readily biodegraded by common microflora.
Increasing the beneficial intestinal microflora by consumption of prebiotics, which are 'functional foods', could be an elegant way to limit the number and incidence of disorders and to recover from dysbiosis or antibiotic treatments.
Shewanella haliotis, a species of rod-shaped, gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacteria, was first isolated from the gut microflora of abalones collected from the ocean near Yeosu, South Korea, by Kim et al.
In addition, the majority of literature sources indicate that the most clinically significant pool of pathogenetic microflora is present not only in the exudate (fluid) of wounds but also in the bio-film that is formed on the surface of the wound or ulcer.