microchimerism

mi·cro·chim·er·ism

(mī'krō-kim'ĕr-izm),
1. The presence of donor cells in a graft recipient.
2. The presence of fetal cells in maternal circulation or of maternal cells in offspring.

microchimerism

A genetic hybrid caused by migration of cells from an allograft into recipient tissue.

mi·cro·chim·er·ism

(mī'krō-kim'ĕr-izm)
The presence of donor cells in a graft recipient, or of fetal cells remaining in maternal circulation, which can be detected by molecular methods but not by flow cytometry.

microchimerism

(mī″krō-kī-mĭr′ĭ-zĭm, kī′mĭ-rĭz″ĭm) [″ + ″]
The presence in a tissue of some cells of alien origin, e.g., of fetal cells in a pregnant woman's bloodstream.
References in periodicals archive ?
BEIJING, April 30, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Microtransplantation is an advanced technology to treat malignant hematological diseases and tumors by infusing patients with processed unmatched HLA stem cells based on chemotherapy or targeted therapy to achieve GVT (graft-versus-tumor) and RVT (recipient-versus-tumor) by microchimerism, making it a less aggressive approach as a leukemia treatment.
Enhanced ascertainment of microchimerism with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification of insertion-deletion polymorphisms.
A specialist in the USA (who's an expert in the effect of pregnancy on RA) suggested that my seemingly miraculous remission may have been due to something called foetal microchimerism - where my baby's genes passed into my blood, giving me some sort of immunity boost.
While the medical implications of male DNA and male cells in the brain are unknown, studies of other kinds of microchimerism - the harboring of genetic material and cells that were exchanged between fetus and mother during pregnancy - have linked the phenomenon to autoimmune diseases and cancer, sometimes for better and other times for worse.
Maternal microchimerism in the livers of patients with biliary atresia.
Absence of replication of porcine endogenous retrovirus and porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus type 1 with prolonged pig cell microchimerism after pig-to-baboon xenotransplantation.
She argues that the phenomenon of microchimerism has provided a new context (and revived life) for old forms of reductionism common in sociobiological discourse during the 1970s and 80s, and soundly critiqued by early feminist STS.
Because there are clinical similarities between SSc and graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (iatrogenic chimerism), it has been speculated that microchimerism may play a role in SSc.
Holzgreve and his colleagues at the University of Basel (Switzerland) began to recognize that the association between microchimerism and maternal disease might extend to preeclampsia and play a role in its pathophysiology.
His major research interests include the epidemiology, natural history, pathogenesis, and laboratory evaluation of transfusion-associated viral infections; and immunologic consequences of allogeneic transfusion, including development of microchimerism and tolerance.
The cells eventually become absorbed into the mother's bone marrow - a process known as fetomaternal microchimerism.
Another hypothesis is that microchimerism, in which cells from at least one other organism wind up in a separate host, could somehow be a trigger for the development of scleroderma.