microbe


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to microbe: archaea, Archæa

microbe

 [mi´krōb]
a microorganism, especially a pathogenic one such as a bacterium, protozoan, or fungus. adj., adj micro´bial, micro´bic.

mi·crobe

(mī'krōb),
Any minute organism. As originated, the word was intended as a collective term for the large variety of microorganisms then known in the 19th century; modern usage has retained the original collective meaning but expanded it to include both microscopic and ultramicroscopic organisms (spirochetes, bacteria, rickettsiae, and viruses). These organisms are considered to form a biologically distinctive group, in that the genetic material is not surrounded by a nuclear membrane, and mitosis does not occur during replication.
[Fr., fr. G. mikros, small, + bios, life]

microbe

/mi·crobe/ (mi´krōb) a microorganism, especially a pathogenic one such as a bacterium, protozoan, or fungus.micro´bialmicro´bic

microbe

(mī′krōb′)
n.
A minute life form; a microorganism, especially a bacterium that causes disease. Not in technical use.

mi·cro′bi·al (mī-krō′bē-əl), mi·cro′bic (-krō′bĭk) adj.

microbe

[mī′krōb]
a microorganism. microbial, adj.

microbe

A microscopic living organism—e.g., bacterium, fungus, protozoan; microorganism.

microbe

 A teensy-weensy organism–eg, bacterium, fungus, protozoan; bug

mi·crobe

(mī'krōb)
Any minute organism, including both microscopic and ultramicroscopic organisms (spirochetes, bacteria, rickettsiae, and viruses). These organisms are considered to form a biologically distinctive group, in that the genetic material is not surrounded by a nuclear membrane and mitosis does not occur during replication.
[Fr., fr. G. mikros, small, + bios, life]

microbe

Any microscopic organism but especially a bacterium or virus capable of causing disease. The word is almost synonymous with, but slightly upmarket from, the term ‘germ’.

microbe

see MICROORGANISM.

microbe

Any very minute living organism, such as bacteria, protozoa, fungi or viruses.

microbe

a microorganism, especially a pathogenic bacterium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Along with geographic variation, the number of microbe species on the plastic pieces also correlated with latitude.
The findings of the research could present a non-invasive way to screen for the disorder, Luo said, because this microbe may be present only in negligible amounts in healthy, young children.
For example, multiple sensors can be installed at different points in a large factory and these can be monitored via computer for changes in microbe counts over time.
2) Microbes can give off fluorescent light when subjected to a certain wavelength of light, making it possible to measure the amount of microbes.
These are only a small sample of the 100 trillion microbes living on and inside your body.
The "Washed Hand" bread piece did not have as much microbe growth on it as the "Dirty Hand" piece.
Parkes, a geomicrobiologist at Cardiff University in Wales, led the new study of microbes and minerals.
March of the Microbes is a very readable narrative about how to find microbes in the world around us.
This PBS site helps students understand how all life depends on the microbes we cannot even see, and even though they can make us sick, microbes are a critical part of our world's ecosystem.
In 2000, to our surprise, we found that microscopic nooks and pits within volcanic seafloor rocks harbor abundant colonies of previously unidentified microbes.
The complex relationship between people and microbes has been evolving for tens of thousands of years.
Even as we are preoccupied with Osama and Omar, our attention is deflected from killer spores and microbes, from shifting ocean currents and simmering volcanoes.