microRNA


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microRNA

(mī′krō-är′ĕn′ā′)
n. Abbr. miRNA
Any of various short, single-stranded RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to messenger RNA molecules, usually in untranslated regions.

microRNA

Any of a group of short (generally 21 to 24 nucleotides in length), non-coding RNA molecules which fold upon themselves (“hairpins”) and are usually cleaved from larger hairpin-containing RNA (itself often processed from some portion of mRNA).

MiRNA is conserved through evolution and plays a role in RNA interference, destroying mRNA made by specific genes, suppressing gene expression and controlling translation of target mRNAs, thereby regulating critical aspects of plant and animal development.

microRNA

(mī′krō-ăr′ĕn″ā″) [″ + ″],

miRNA

Oligonucleotides that prevent a variety of messenger RNAs from being transcribed from DNA or translated into proteins. They typically consist of 21 to 25 linked nucleotides.

microRNA

Very short segments of RNA involved in RNA INTERFERENCE and recently shown to be important elements in the development of plant structure. Many genes that code for microRNA have been found in many species including H. sapiens . There is much current speculation into their role in human development.
References in periodicals archive ?
In effect, the microRNA stimulated the pathway in the brain that increases aversive reactions to cocaine, thereby decreasing the motivation to consume the drug.
Various statements in this release concerning Rosetta's future expectations, plans and prospects, including without limitation, statements relating to: the potential to use microRNA-based molecular breeding to develop algal strains and non-food crops for improved biofuel production; the receipt of additional financing when certain milestones have been met and the role of microRNAs in plant and algal physiology and development constitute forward-looking statements for the purposes of the safe harbor provisions under The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.
Nina Bhardwaj at NYU, and deploying the proprietary tools developed at Rosetta Genomics for microRNA extraction, identification and quantification, will help to more fully understand melanoma and subsequently the prognosis of melanoma patients.
Once inside a host cell, a virus tricks the cell into producing these microRNAs, which then shut down genes that protect against infection by that virus.
SM] goals in 2015), the projected timeline of clinical development activities, and expectations regarding future therapeutic and commercial potential of Regulus' business plans (including Regulus' expected future activities in 2015), technologies and intellectual property related to microRNA therapeutics and biomarkers being discovered and developed by Regulus.
professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, with a GW graduate student and collaborators at the National Institute of Mental Health, identified changes in the profile of microRNAs between identical twins and sibling pairs, discordant for diagnosis of autism.
Various statements in this release concerning Rosetta's future expectations, plans and prospects, including without limitation, statements relating to the potential of microRNAs to act as effective biomarkers for a diagnostic test designed to identify primary tumors in patients with brain cancers, the role of microRNAs in human physiology and disease, the potential of microRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of disease, and the timing of launch of the first diagnostic tests applying Rosetta's microRNA technology constitute forward-looking statements for the purposes of the safe harbor provisions under The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.
Included in these applications are microRNA extraction protocols for various body fluids such as
A single microRNA can regulate entire networks of genes.
They offer the opportunity for R&D planning efforts addressing the question of “which microRNA content needs to be addressed in a particular disease class.
Exiqon's microRNA PCR product line is being used for microRNA expression profiling in a variety of sample types including difficult samples like blood serum and FFPE.
5%) of the circulating microRNAs reported by the authors originated from a region on chromosome 19 known to contain a large cluster of microRNA genes and other genomic elements involved in placental growth and development (8).