miasma

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miasma

[mī·az′mə]
Etymology: Gk, miainein, defilement
an unwholesome, polluted atmosphere or environment, such as a marsh or swamp containing rotting organic matter. Also called miasm [mī′əzəm] .

miasma

noxious exhalations from putrescent organic matter; the basis for an early concept of the origin of epidemics.
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Unlike other scholars, such as Bernard Gerndon, who focus on the political intention of such transgressions, (3) Scott argues that it is popular music's miasmic conventions that allow for cultural exploration.
8) This view stood in the classical Greek and medieval tradition of the miasmic theory of disease.
Author O'Toole outlines the process of government planning: legislators with miasmic self-interest write laws lacking specificity so they can turn them over to entrenched bureaucrats who translate law into detailed administrative rules and regulations.
Snow's map--and the work that preceded it-suggested that the nature of cholera was not miasmic, but rather tied to the source of drinking water.
Remembering, re-plotting his life's moments from this terminus ad quem should bring some transparency to this miasmic flow.
though spectres ride you out of town, the air of trains, miasmic.
Woods, who has won 11 of his last 16 tournaments, is a one-person stimulus package for a sports world miasmic with A-Rod steroid tales and the fall of Charles Barkley, the drunk locked up on a driving-under-the-influence conviction.
From fumigation with incense to dispel miasmic air during the bubonic plague, to the scientific advent of more modern infection theory as depicted epidemiologically in the work of Venetian Fracastoro (1483-1553), varied methods of infection control have been attempted.
REAMER, REHABILITATING JUVENILE JUSTICE 6-8 (1986) ("The perceptions of the young offender as a child not culpable for his acts and as a victim of unintended but miasmic social conditions did not change dramatically during the first half-century of the juvenile court's life.
Contemplating this repressive environment, the narrator notices that the "poisonous emanations of suppression, persecution, and fear permeated the air like miasmic and pestilential vapors, tainting, sickening, and blighting the lives of everyone he met" (633).
117) As described above, common wisdom held that these diseases spread in miasmic air.
the woman who had quitted home and kin on a flood of tears and in a shadowy miasmic region something like the bitter purlieus of Styx had produced two children and then rose like the swamp-hatched butterfly, unimpeded by weight of stomach and all the heavy organs of suffering and experience, into a perennial bright vacuum of arrested sun.