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metric

 [met´rik]
1. pertaining to measures or measurement.
2. having the meter as a basis.
metric system the system of units of measurement that is based on the meter, gram, and liter and in which new units are formed from the basic terms by prefixes denoting multiplication by a power of ten. See also si units.

met·ric

(met'rik),
Quantitative; relating to measurement. See: metric system.
[G. metrikos, fr. metron, measure]

metric

/met·ric/ (mĕ´trik)
1. pertaining to measures or measurement.
2. having the meter as a basis.

metric

[met′rik]
pertaining to a system of measurement that uses the meter as a basis. See also metric system.

met·ric

(met'rik)
Quantitative; relating to measurement.
See: metric system
[G. metrikos, fr. metron, measure]

metric

1. of or pertaining to the metric system.
2. pertaining to measures or measurement.
3. having the meter as a basis.

metric system
the system of units of measurement that is based on the meter, gram and liter, and in which new units are formed by prefixes denoting multiplication by a power of ten. See also Tables 4.1-4.6.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rig Veda: A Metrically Restored Text with an Introduction and Notes.
Such features convey affective torsions given metrically in such features as the emphasized off-beats at the beginning of lines two and three ("And," "Your").
Notice that in each model of Example 4 the eighth-note pulsations of the two layers are coordinated on some basic level, so that there are relatively frequent simultaneous articulations, whether or not they are metrically significant.
On the other hand, Wulf and Eadwacer has been shown to be metrically abnormal: why then suggest that its striking opening would be less 'bizarre', syntactically at least, if it read *leodum minum is.
Terasawa shows that the metrical constraints on compounds can contribute towards deciding how controversial half-lines in Beowulf should be scanned; he also shows that certain suggested readings of corrupt passages can be dismissed as metrically unacceptable (Chapters 2.
Notated metrically with noteheads and finger numbers, The Highlands of Scotland is a lovely black-key melody, played by three fingers in each hand, written in a simple AB form with repeat, making it easy to learn and memorize.
vi], but not included in the bibliography), Willem Bollee now publishes "a romanized and metrically revised version" of the text, altogether 6,490 gathas covering 784 pages.
In the preface the translators stress that they have turned the rhymed couplets into a variety of English meters "couplets, quatrains, metrically flexible blank verse" because no English verse corresponds "even remotely to the French alexandrine" (xviii).
Most sensitive souls walked and mused in these times and the vicar of Dudley happened to muse metrically.
The author presents finally a musical score with the so-called "Kleene- Song," a ribald set of badly rhymed and metrically deficient verses primarily in English, which include such lines as "Once ago there was a young guy called Kleene / It was a fucking smart and effective machine, / It fits either sex, concave and convex - HASSKAPPEN Ex
118) it seems unconvincing to me to list the 'noncompounds', that is, the noncompounded second element -bende of the compound lindhaebbende forming lines 245a and similarly -mendra of gudhfremmendra forming line 246a as metrically similar to the -gares of thegn Hrodhgares of lines 235a, with the middle syllable of the name reduced in stress, much as it is unconvincing in Sievers's system that middle syllable (-end-) of the 'noncompound' is equal in stress to that of compounds (including names).
It often forms a metrically independent colon or group of feet of less than regular length.