metonymy


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Related to metonymy: synecdoche

metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
References in periodicals archive ?
Metonymy is another productive figuration device employed in standard English.
Dr kazazi defined this kind of metonymy as: <<there is no sign or word or words that have been spoken openly about the norm but we find that the word is used in a figurative sense.
The details about the difference and overlaps between metaphor and metonymy are beyond the scope of this paper.
Little Hans" in Freud's famous case-study uses a metonymy when he transfers his hatred and fear of his father--which he feels in the street when walking with him--to the horses he sees there in almost the same way as Woolf does when talking about Orlando's stockings instead of talking about his/her body.
To understand the role of metonymy in Farah's text more clearly, it is necessary to focus on it as the main vehicle of representation.
This problem led to an extensive discussion of "figurative" usage and to its classification, in later treatises, such as Vrttivarttika, into minutely differentiated subtypes, such as whether the base meaning (to which the figurative refers) of the word or phrase survives in any way in the resultant understanding, or whether the referent of the metonymy is subsumed in the metonym or retains at least verbally its separate status, etc.
The fantasy of metaphor promises durable, efficacious, efficient substitutions, not the time- and space-dependent associations of metonymy characterized by contingency rather than essence.
Lakoff and Johnson would assert that our concept of the Caribbean is a case of part-for-whole metonymy because the name of the sea turns into the designation of the entire territory (36).
The basic ideas and terms used in the cognitive theory of metaphor and metonymy are briefly listed: conceptual metaphors as fundamental tools humans use to conceptualize their world picture and everyday experiences; the concepts projection and mapping; conceptual domains, (image) schemas, scripts, frames, mental spaces, etc.
Firstly, may I say that although I am not an English scholar I am fully aware of metonymy.
The latter characterization is problematic because the survey of these midlevel functionaries could not really merit the metonymy used to suggest a state position.
Idylls of the King ultimately charts a movement from metonymy to metaphor, the latter the poetics of an imperial heroism (marked by a rejection of arbitrary violence and an uxorious "lust of gold") and a transnational empire that renounces the localized Arthurian project of concatenation and expulsion--a vision instantiated and realized in the casting off of Excalibur.