metonymy

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metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
References in periodicals archive ?
Describing the gift as an "esquilmo" would metonymically remind the Duke of the primary source fueling the family's coffers, the wool trade, and of his ability to reward the fruit of Encina's labors.
While the sari may stand metonymically for the femininity of its wearer, Devi renders both the sari and the subjectivity it is supposed to signify epistemologically unable to be deciphered.
It comes as no surprise, then, that this radical desire, the Other of Theory's declared position, was expressed metonymically, through other means.
3) These words were said by the centurion who in the preceding verse stated that he was not worthy that Jesus should come to his house; the phrase under my roof may be understood literally or metonymically 'into my house'.
DG When an artist creates metonymically, the artwork is a seamless extension of the artist's state of mind.
Metonymically, it suggests white faces (mouths) that proclaim law and confer identity.
Metonymically, it is at once a state-sponsored warehousing of black male bodies that lines the pockets of countless corporate interests in what has become widely known as the "prison industrial complex"; it is also state-sponsored commodification of black bodies, a modern-day reincarnation of a slaveocracy that exploits a black labor pool without monetary remuneration.
The lesbian becomes the mirror within which the male poet gazes to explore his own arousal; the Sapphic text metonymically represents the voyeurized and dismembered lesbian body; language as an autonomous system comes to embody the perversity of the Decadence.
4) The crucial point in defining indigenous knowledges ms to be the recognition of their place-based locus of production and communities ethnically distinct and socio-historically distant from national centers of political and economic power This characteristic appears to be metonymically represented by the prefix "ethno-" and the ease with which it is attached to these knowledges, carrying with it a connotation of negative or reduced worth.
But while on the one hand the song references the power and energy of First Nations peoples, it is a pop song metonymically connected with the structuring force of the system of power overlaid onto indigenous space, even as it is metaphorically an expression of personal desire.
As in Hemingway's "Cat in the Rain," the central concerns of the story emerge through the author's use of contrasting, cumulative references: the freedom and adventurousness of the outside world, for example, contrasts to the stifling enclosure of an apartment literally being "boxed up" while sexuality and "Goodwill," metonymically linked, remain inaccessible to Renee.
In Finucci's and Brownlee's book, it can refer, rather literally, to the biological conception of Jesus or of Tasso's heroine Clorinda in their mother's womb, but also, more metonymically, to the representation of menstruation and the clitoris in different discourses, to the literary genealogy of women and men writers, or to the historical descent of western medicine.