metonymy

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metonymy

 [mĕ-ton´ĭ-me]
a disturbance of language seen in schizophrenia in which an inappropriate but related term is used instead of the correct one.

me·ton·y·my

(mĕ-ton'i-mē)
Imprecise or circumscribed labeling of objects or events, characteristic of the language disturbance of people with schizophrenia; e.g., the patient speaks of having had a "menu" rather than a "meal."
[meta- + G. onyma, name]

metonymy

(mĕ-tŏn′ĭ-mē) [Gr. meta, after, beyond, over, + onyma, name]
1. In rhetoric, a figure of speech in which one word is used for another, related one (e.g., “crown” for “king, ” “queen, ” “monarch, ” or “sovereign”).
2. In psychiatry, mental confusion exhibited in some schizophrenic disorders in which an imprecise but loosely related term is used for the correct one (e.g., “rifle” for “war, ” or “apple” for “ball”).
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the traditional notion of a fragment, Blanchot claims, echoing Benjamin's metonymically oriented line of reasoning, "the fragment supposes an implicit designation of something which has previously been or will subsequently become whole - the severed finger refers back to the hand, just as the first atom prefigures and contains in itself the universe.
In the illustrations as in the written text, the aristocratic spaces are constructed metonymically, through the depiction of a few material objects selected to stand in for the rooms those objects fill.
This work is in the nature of installation marking a site where objects metonymically express the process of change and transformation in life.
7) In the speech, similar patterns of pronominal usage emerge, but, as we shall see, the situation is more complex, and it will be demonstrated that Obama's use of we is strategic, and it is extended metonymically to represent all Americans.
Significantly, Luciano also recognizes that Candace closely resembles Dianthe (178), who, we have seen, metonymically represents the mother, Mira, for Reuel and so "continues the matriarchal tradition established by" Mira and her mother, Hannah (180).
Furthermore, just as foretold, Lauso's bones in death become a part of the morada de los celos, as he metonymically joins his brethren in the cave, exchanging his jealous life for jealousy in death, becoming himself the "vivo traslado" of which he spoke.
A preliminary study on the availability of metonymically used names of capitals (Brdar-Szabo and Brdar 2003) showed that this particular type of metonymy is ubiquitous in English and German, while less so in Hungarian and Croatian.
The story Ellis tells is one in which fables of seduction let sexuality function metonymically for subjectivity.
To the extent that a photograph has a punctum, it has been endowed (by us) with the power of cinema to expand metonymically into the space off-frame, releasing everything in-frame (and us) from absolute death.
Although the gendering of geographic spaces is hardly an unfamiliar trope, Bob metonymically considers Madge as a very particular state: Texas, with its reputedly unforgiving racial hierarchy and swift punishments for black transgressions.
As in Hemingway's "Cat in the Rain," the central concerns of the story emerge through the author's use of contrasting, cumulative references: the freedom and adventurousness of the outside world, for example, contrasts to the stifling enclosure of an apartment literally being "boxed up" while sexuality and "Goodwill," metonymically linked, remain inaccessible to Renee.
In Finucci's and Brownlee's book, it can refer, rather literally, to the biological conception of Jesus or of Tasso's heroine Clorinda in their mother's womb, but also, more metonymically, to the representation of menstruation and the clitoris in different discourses, to the literary genealogy of women and men writers, or to the historical descent of western medicine.