methylxanthine


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Related to methylxanthine: caffeine, aminophylline, Xanthines

methylxanthine

(mĕth″ĭl-zăn′thēn)
A group of naturally occurring agents present in caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. They act on the central nervous system, stimulate the myocardium, relax smooth muscle, and promote diuresis. A commonly prescribed methylxanthine is theophylline, which is used primarily to treat asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

methylxanthine (meth´ilzan´thēn),

n diuretic agent (e.g., aminophylline, caffeine, or theophylline) that serves as a smooth muscle relaxant and cardiac muscle and CNS stimulant. Clinically, it is employed as a bronchodilator.

methylxanthine

methylated derivatives of xanthine, including caffeine, theobromine and theophylline.
References in periodicals archive ?
Methylxanthines include a number of compounds with stimulant effects, such as caffeine and theophylline, ingredients of coffee and tea.
It also contains EPGC methylxanthine blend (a natural caffeine source derived from natural green tea leaf extract), panax ginseng, vinpocetine, B-complex vitamins, and other essential vitamins and minerals.
The most significant difference in the two groups was a significant fraction (47%) of the autistic patients with undetectable levels of 7- methylxanthine in their urine.
Although a causal relationship between methylxanthine (theophylline and caffeine citrate) use and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) has not been established, infants should be carefully monitored for the development of NEC during treatment with CAFCIT.
The Phase I trial was designed to determine the maximum tolerated concentration of lisofylline, a novel methylxanthine inhibitor of cytokine-induced phosphatidic acid, which had previously indicated an ability to inhibit interleukin-1 (IL-1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) signal transduction.
Limited attention has been paid to the possible role of metabolites of methylxanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis, although their average daily output in urine, depending on dietary intake, is ~500 mg/day (4), which equals the output of UA.
A simplified diagram of the metabolism of methylxanthines in humans is shown in Fig.
The absence of 9-MUA is consistent with the assumption that MUAs in stones are metabolites of methylxanthines originating from plants, which never contain a methyl group at N-9 of the purine ring.