methylation


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Related to methylation: acetylation

methylation

 [meth″ĭ-la´shun]
the addition of methyl groups.

meth·yl·a·tion

(meth-i-lā'shŭn),
Addition of methyl groups; in histochemistry, used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid, the net effect being to reduce tissue basophilia and abolish metachromasia.

methylation

[-lā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, methy, wine, hyle, matter
1 the introduction of a methyl group, CH3, to a chemical compound.
2 the addition of methyl alcohol and naphtha to ethanol to produce denatured alcohol.

methylation

Chemistry
The addition of a methyl group to a molecule.
 
Molecular biology
The addition of a methyl group to a cytosine residue on double-stranded DNA, a process which plays a major role in regulating gene expression and preventing restriction endonucleases from cutting DNA at their recognition sites.
 
Methylated genes are inactive; the pattern of methylation or imprinting is critical in gene expression, and may be passed from one generation to the next. Genes may be demethylated or methylated de novo according to the cell’s function, or during normal development. Phosphorylation is another form of semi-permanent gene control.

meth·yl·a·tion

(meth'i-lā'shŭn)
Addition of methyl groups; in histochemistry, used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid; the net effect being to reduce tissue basophilia and abolish metachromasia.

methylation

the addition of a methyl group (-CH3) to an AMINO ACID in a PROTEIN, as in, for example, POST-TRANSLATIONAL MODIFICATION, or to a NUCLEOTIDE in a NUCLEIC ACID; see MODIFICATION AND RESTRICTION SYSTEM. See also METHYL TRANSFERASE.

methylation,

n a phase-II detoxification pathway in the liver; methyl groups combine with toxins to rid the body of various substances.

meth·yl·a·tion

(meth'i-lā'shŭn)
Addition of methyl groups; in histochemistry, used to esterify carboxyl groups and remove sulfate groups by treating tissue sections with hot methanol in the presence of hydrochloric acid.

methylation

(meth´əlā´shən),
n 1. the introduction of a methyl group, CH3, to a chemical compound.
n 2. the addition of methyl alcohol and naphtha to ethanol to produce denatured alcohol.

methylation

the addition of methyl groups.
References in periodicals archive ?
Orion's MethylScope technology, exclusively licensed from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, is the only platform capable of detecting inappropriate DNA methylation for all human genes on a single array, providing an efficient and comprehensive biomarker discovery tool.
The research will use Orion's proprietary DNA methylation technologies, including MethylScope(r) microarrays and MethylScreen(r) PCR assays.
DNA methylation is a key epigenetic feature," said John Stamatoyannopoulos, director of the Northwest Reference Epigenome Mapping Center at the University of Washington.
Four gene loci showed significant changes in methylation status in relation to urinary arsenic concentration.
Lead researcher Karine Le Roch, an associate professor of cell biology at University of California said the DNA methylation enzyme found in Plasmodium is quite different than the one in humans.
Our results suggest that lead exposure during pregnancy affects the DNA methylation status of the fetal germ cells, which leads to altered DNA methylation in grandchildren's neonatal dried blood spots," said Ruden.
In this study, we examined whether air pollution affects DNA methylation across nine quantiles of the methylation distribution.
10) The structure of the chromatin regulates transcription, and DNA methylation affects chromatin stability.
We separated the muscle and IMF portion from the intact LM tissues to determine tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern, as previously described (Bong et al.
Mutations in TETs are known to lead to aberrant changes in DNA methylation patterns that are strongly associated with a variety of diseases.
As a biomarker in clinical oncology, DNA methylation analysis eliminates the need for expensive patient-specific genetic testing yet can robustly define disease state and direct-targeted therapeutics (5-10).
One area frequently impacted by genetic mutations that has received a great deal of attention is the methylation cycle.