reincarnation

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reincarnation

(rē-ĭn-kăr-nā′shŭn) [″ + incarnation]
1. The belief held by members of some religious groups that a person returns in physical or spiritual form to live again after death.
2. A renewal of interest in an old or previously discarded idea.
3. A psychological or spiritual reawakening of someone who had previously been engaged in a wholly different set of activities or interests.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Both Voltaire and Hume directly address metempsychosis, for example, the former to claim that it was "not absurd; everything in nature is resurrection"; the latter to state that it was entirely absurd, a concept arising from fears of death.
For many of them, metempsychosis seemed to have been an attractive solution, despite the fact that Ibn Sina showed no understanding for such an idea.
Borlik discusses the English Renaissance reception of Pythagoras, including the doctrine of metempsychosis, in Ecocritism and Early Modern English Literature: Green Pastures (New York: Routledge, 2011), 24-74.
And, in this godless world, only the artist could become the creator, the destroyer of myths and beliefs, and only he/she through his/her art could provide metempsychosis to salvage humanity.
takes the concept of metempsychosis, mainly within its Jewish contexts, as an axis around which to study and analyze developments in Renaissance intellectual history.
Metempsychosis is the transmigration of the soul from one animal to another, and odd as the question seems in thinking about the South African artist William Kentridge, it has a curious resonance with this survey, recently on view in San Francisco, precisely because there is a single essence that inhabits his every theme and leap from medium to medium--whether drawing, animation, installation, sculpture, or opera--and that is the ruthlessness, or should I say the wolf, of change.
Again and again, and with striking versatility, The House of Life re-enacts this process of textual metempsychosis, molding it into a genuine maternal root metaphor with runners that not only control the outer reaches of the sequence, but also ambitiously creep into literary history itself.
Similarly, Synge is primarily a religious poet, attracted by the doctrine of metempsychosis as an alternative to his familial Anglicanism.
The odd circular moments are emphasized in another letter: "And there is an indistinct moment I don't know whether long or short (but this doesn't matter much), which the adepts of metempsychosis call the anastole in their code, in which everything starts over as the circle closes and reopens immediately" (italics mine).
Rosa Bonheur the French sculptor believed in metempsychosis, which means that human souls migrate into animal forms.
Metempsychosis is a constant theme in Johnson's poetry, but the sense of trial is greater here.
When Buddha taught his followers the doctrine of metempsychosis he ensured an excellent way of protecting animals, whereas Christianity abandons them to every sort of brutality by proclaiming that they are made for man and therefore at his mercy.