metatypical

met·a·typ·i·cal

(met'ă-tip'i-kăl),
Pertaining to tissue that is formed of elements identical to those occurring in that site under normal conditions, but the various elements are not arranged in the usual normal pattern.

metatypical

(mĕt″ă-tĭp′ĭ-kăl)
Tissue elements similar to those of other tissues at the same site, but having components that are disorganized.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metatypical BCC has a component of squamous differentiation within angulated nests of tumor cells, imparting morphologic overlap with squamous cell carcinoma.
The latter included the infiltrative, morpheic, micronodular and metatypical (basosquamous) subtypes.
Features of biopsy in diagnosis of metatypical basal cell carcinoma (Basosquamous Carcinoma) of head and neck.
This carcinoma is also known as metatypical carcinoma, basaloid squamous cell-carcinoma, and basal squamous cell-epithelioma.
The histopathological subtypes of BCC in this study were classified into nine major patterns: Nodular, superficial, micronodular, infiltrative, keratotic, morpheaform, metatypical, adenoid, and infundibulocystic types.
For example, keratotic BCC and metatypical BCC are very similar to basaloid SCC in H and E prepared microscopic
It is a common trend to call such tumors as metatypical or basosquamous carcinomas.
These basosquamous carcinomas, also known as metatypical basal cell carcinomas, pose a greater threat of metastatic disease, Dr.
Metatypical BCC or basosquamous carcinoma is a controversial entity with different definitions, but overall is probably best described as a variation of infiltrative BCC with squamous differentiation, and is thought to possess greater metastatic potential.
26] Metatypical or basosquamous carcinoma is a subtype that is characterized by varying degrees of squamous differentiation.
19) Metatypical BCC has been used synonymously with basosquamous carcinoma by some authors (6,18-19) and by others, it is used to describe tumors that have overlapping features of both squamous and basal cell carcinomas, (20) which is how the term is used at our institution.