metastatic calcification


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Related to metastatic calcification: dystrophic calcification

met·a·stat·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

calcification occurring in nonosseous, viable tissue (that is, tissue that is not degenerated or necrotic), as in the stomach, lungs, and kidneys (and rarely in other sites); the cells of these organs secrete acid materials, and, under certain conditions in instances of hypercalcemia, the alteration in pH causes precipitation of calcium salts in these sites.

metastatic calcification

Etymology: Gk, meta + stasis, standing; L, calx, lime, facere, to make
the pathological process whereby calcium salts accumulate in previously healthy tissues, caused by excessive levels of blood calcium, such as in hyperparathyroidism.

metastatic calcification

The deposition of calcium in otherwise normal, non-osseous tissue—e.g., kidneys, blood vessels (vascular media), lungs, stomach, heart and eyes—which is usually not associated with malignancy, due to increased levels of calcium in the serum. This contrasts to dystrophic calcification, in which serum calcium levels are normal and local tissue conditions set the stage for calcium deposition.

met·a·stat·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(met'ă-stat'ik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in nonosseous, viable tissue in hypercalcemia.

met·a·stat·ic cal·ci·fi·ca·tion

(met'ă-stat'ik kal'si-fi-kā'shŭn)
Calcification occurring in nonosseous viable tissue in hypercalcemia.

calcification

the deposit of calcium salts in a tissue. The normal absorption of calcium is facilitated by parathyroid hormone and by vitamin D. In poisoning with calcinogenic glycosides and when there are increased amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood (as in hyperparathyroidism), there is deposition of calcium in the soft tissue. (In hyperparathyroidism secondary to renal disease there is deposition in the alveoli of the lungs, the renal tubules, beneath the parietal pleura, the gastric mucosa, and the arterial walls.) Normally calcium is deposited in the bone matrix to insure stability and strength of the bone. In osteomalacia there is an excess of unmineralized osteoid because the aged well-mineralized bone is replaced by a matrix that is inadequately mineralized.

dystrophic calcification
the deposition of calcium in abnormal tissue without abnormalities of blood calcium.
metastatic calcification
deposition of calcium in tissues as a result of abnormalities of calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood and tissue fluids.
nutritional calcification
calcification in soft tissues as a result of an increased intake of calcium.
soft tissue calcification
see metastatic calcification (above), dystrophic calcification (above).

metastatic

pertaining to or of the nature of a metastasis.

metastatic abscesses
abscesses seeded down in tissues distant from a mother abscess.
metastatic calcification
deposition of calcification in soft tissues, e.g. muscles and connective tissue.
metastatic cascade
the series of events leading to metastasis, starting with detachment of neoplastic cells from the primary site through to attachment and tumor growth at a distant site.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metastatic calcification usually results from a deposition of calcified products in otherwise normal tissues as a result of hyperphosphataemia with or without hypercalcaemia.
Metastatic calcification affecting the myocardium and lungs is potentially lethal and is rarely detected before death, because of the absence of specific radiographic abnormalities.
Tumoral calcinosis-like metastatic calcifications in a patient on renal dialysis.