metamorphosis

(redirected from metamorphoses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

metamorphosis

 [met″ah-mor´fo-sis]
change of structure or shape; particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form. adj., adj metamor´phic.
fatty metamorphosis any normal or pathologic transformation of fat, including fatty infiltration and fatty degeneration.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis),
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): allaxis, transformation (1)
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]

metamorphosis

/meta·mor·pho·sis/ (met″ah-mor´fah-sis) change of structure or shape, particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form.metamor´phic
fatty metamorphosis  fatty change.

metamorphosis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. metamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.

metamorphosis

[met′əmôr′fəsis]
Etymology: Gk, meta + morphe, form
a change in shape or structure, especially a change from one stage of development to another, such as the transition from the larval to the adult stage.

metamorphosis

A marked transformation in appearance, form or substance.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis)
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): transformation (1) .
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]

metamorphosis

Major alterations in structure and appearance occurring in an organism, such as the human embryo, in the process of its development from egg (ovum) to baby.

metamorphosis

the change in an organism from larval to adult form, which is often quite rapid, as in tadpole to frog, caterpillar to butterfly. Metamorphosis is said to be ‘incomplete’ where there is gradual development of a NYMPH to an adult, as in the EXOPTERYGOTA (Hetero- or Hemi-metabola), e.g. cockroach, locust. It is ‘complete’ where a pupa occurs, as in the ENDOPTERYGOTA (Holometabola), e.g. housefly, butterfly.

metamorphosis

change of structure or shape; particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form.

fatty metamorphosis
any normal or pathological transformation of fat, including fatty infiltration and fatty degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
As is occasionally the case in this book, the strengths of the section on Philomela overlap closely with its weaknesses: argumentative density threatens to overwhelm digestibility (to indulge a cannibalistic pun) as the author nuances the episode's evocation of tragic performance with a diverse range of contexts including the Platonic critique of mimesis as involving dangerous forms of identification, the civic dimensions of Greek myth critically reimagined as Roman exemplum, the motion of tragic temporality toward repetition and regression, and the intertextual dialogue between Metamorphoses and Fasti raised by the Philomela myth, particularly as it involves an articulation of civic identity.
Even the transitions between the myths in Metamorphoses take place in full view of the audience--"I don't like blackouts," she says.
Since, unlike the metamorphoses described by Ovid, the miraculous event of Samsa is never connected with anything outside itself - there is no explanatory framework for the miraculous change - the metamorphosis, says Sokel, is a symbol only in the sense that events occurring in dreams are symbols: like a hieroglyphic sign or a pictorial script, it expresses, without revealing, the essence of a hidden situation (Writer 47).
As well as being a source for individual tales, the Metamorphoses has served as a spur to thinking about metamorphosis itself and its relation to the process of artistic revision" (Kilgour, 267).
A vision that encounters the Metamorphoses as a whole is, Lyne proposes, a feature uniting the four poems, and a key theme of his four chapters, which explore not only the interactions of the English texts with their Latin background, but also with each other.
In the extensively illustrated second chapter, Acocella examines the interplay of visual and verbal representations of l'asino d'oro, focusing on the tale of Cupid and Psyche, an embedded narrative in Apuleius' Metamorphoses that enjoyed an autonomous success.
Maslen draws on pedagogical institutions, rhetorical tracts, and translations to sketch out ways in which the Metamorphoses was available to political interpretation in the sixteenth century; John Roe takes a complementary approach to two erotic poems, Hero and Leander and Venus and Adonis.
Indeed, even though it is a principal subtext for much of the Clytorie story (fable 1), Ovid's tale of Semele and Bacchus in Metamorphoses 3:254-315 forgoes all reference to the wet nurse extolled by Tyard (acknowledging only that the prematurely delivered baby was tended by Ino and the girls of Nysa), to say nothing of a description of her mutation.
18-22) As is well known, the reference is to Ovid's Metamorphoses, that staple resource of Shakespearean myth and mutation.
Ovid's Metamorphoses is naturally enough the central focus, and the concept of metamorphosis and related terms is conscientiously traced from Martianus Capella to late sixteenth-century emblems.
1) This essay, by no means comprehensive, points toward a fuller understanding of Ovid and Renaissance art by showing how the classical author's work - primarily the Metamorphoses and, to a lesser degree, his Fasti - played an extensive and deep role in the "poetry" of Renaissance painting and sculpture.
From the crisis over the Palatinate to the Order of the Garter to the Laudian beautification of the church, from Virginia to Little Gidding to Great Tew, from Agamemnon to Scylla and Charybdis to the Ovidian translation of epic combat into metamorphoses - the Caroline church is distinguished by its transmission, transformation, and analysis of interconnected but also hostile versions of religious heroism.