metamorphosis

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metamorphosis

 [met″ah-mor´fo-sis]
change of structure or shape; particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form. adj., adj metamor´phic.
fatty metamorphosis any normal or pathologic transformation of fat, including fatty infiltration and fatty degeneration.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis),
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): allaxis, transformation (1)
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]

metamorphosis

/meta·mor·pho·sis/ (met″ah-mor´fah-sis) change of structure or shape, particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form.metamor´phic
fatty metamorphosis  fatty change.

metamorphosis

(mĕt′ə-môr′fə-sĭs)
n. pl. metamorpho·ses (-sēz′)
1. A transformation, as by magic or sorcery.
2. A marked change in appearance, character, condition, or function.
3. Biology Change in the form and often habits of an animal during normal development after the embryonic stage. Metamorphosis includes, in insects, the transformation of a maggot into an adult fly and a caterpillar into a butterfly and, in amphibians, the changing of a tadpole into a frog.
4. A usually degenerative change in the structure of a particular body tissue.

metamorphosis

[met′əmôr′fəsis]
Etymology: Gk, meta + morphe, form
a change in shape or structure, especially a change from one stage of development to another, such as the transition from the larval to the adult stage.

metamorphosis

A marked transformation in appearance, form or substance.

met·a·mor·pho·sis

(met'ă-mōr'fŏ-sis)
1. A change in form, structure, or function.
2. Transition from one developmental stage to another.
Synonym(s): transformation (1) .
[G. metamorphōsis, transformation fr. meta, beyond, over, + morphē, form]

metamorphosis

Major alterations in structure and appearance occurring in an organism, such as the human embryo, in the process of its development from egg (ovum) to baby.

metamorphosis

the change in an organism from larval to adult form, which is often quite rapid, as in tadpole to frog, caterpillar to butterfly. Metamorphosis is said to be ‘incomplete’ where there is gradual development of a NYMPH to an adult, as in the EXOPTERYGOTA (Hetero- or Hemi-metabola), e.g. cockroach, locust. It is ‘complete’ where a pupa occurs, as in the ENDOPTERYGOTA (Holometabola), e.g. housefly, butterfly.

metamorphosis

change of structure or shape; particularly, transition from one developmental stage to another, as from larva to adult form.

fatty metamorphosis
any normal or pathological transformation of fat, including fatty infiltration and fatty degeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter 5, 'The Isis Book: Serious Entertainment', analyses the significance of the last book of the Metamorphoses in both its serious and its comic circumstances.
As is occasionally the case in this book, the strengths of the section on Philomela overlap closely with its weaknesses: argumentative density threatens to overwhelm digestibility (to indulge a cannibalistic pun) as the author nuances the episode's evocation of tragic performance with a diverse range of contexts including the Platonic critique of mimesis as involving dangerous forms of identification, the civic dimensions of Greek myth critically reimagined as Roman exemplum, the motion of tragic temporality toward repetition and regression, and the intertextual dialogue between Metamorphoses and Fasti raised by the Philomela myth, particularly as it involves an articulation of civic identity.
Even the transitions between the myths in Metamorphoses take place in full view of the audience--"I don't like blackouts," she says.
Larvae of several molluscan species can be induced to metamorphose by an increase in external potassium ion concentration (Baloun and Morse, 1984; Yool et al.
Since, unlike the metamorphoses described by Ovid, the miraculous event of Samsa is never connected with anything outside itself - there is no explanatory framework for the miraculous change - the metamorphosis, says Sokel, is a symbol only in the sense that events occurring in dreams are symbols: like a hieroglyphic sign or a pictorial script, it expresses, without revealing, the essence of a hidden situation (Writer 47).
2) Shakespeare's considerable indebtedness to Ovid's Metamorphoses and to Arthur Golding's 1567 English translation has long been acknowledged.
Keith makes a point of first treating the Hecale independently, to avoid a circular comparison of the Metamorphoses with an Ovid-influenced reconstruction of Callimachus.
Repeat Performances: Ovidian Repetition and the Metamorphoses
The Metamorphoses of Tintin: Or Tintin for Adults" discusses the creation of Tintin, created by Belgian Georges Remi, or Herge as he's known, nearly a century ago and has captivated European readers ever since.
As its title suggests, this collection of essays examines the influence of Ovid's Metamorphoses in pre-modern and early modern Europe.
Most of Ovid's major works are challenged: Metamorphoses, Ars amatoria, Amores, Fasti, and Heroides are brought forward in comparison with English, French, and Italian Renaissance writers who imitated Ovid's works of different genres in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.