metalloid


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metalloid

 [met´ah-loid]
1. any element with both metallic and nonmetallic properties.
2. any metallic element that does not have all the characters of a typical metal.

met·al·loid

(met'ă-loyd),
Resembling a metal in at least one amphoteric form, for example, silicon and germanium as semiconductors.
[metal + G. eidos, resemblance]

metalloid

[met′əloid]
1 any element with both metallic and nonmetallic properties, such as silicon, boron, or arsenic.
2 resembling a metal.

met·al·loid

(met'ă-loyd)
Resembling a metal in at least one amphoteric form.
[metal + G. eidos, resemblance]

metalloid (met´əloid),

n a nonmetallic element that behaves as a metal under certain conditions. Carbon, silicon, and boron are three examples. These elements may be alloyed with metals.

metalloid

1. any element with both metallic and nonmetallic properties.
2. any metallic element that has not all the characteristics of a typical metal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides malnutrition and hereditary-based perturbations on metal homeostasis and consequent health effects, occupational and environmental exposure to toxic heavy metals and metalloids also result in adverse health effects.
For elements, we focused on metals and metalloids from major elemental groups for which the number of samples below the detection limit (BDL) was < 5%.
Such practices cause the annual transfer of several hundred tonnes of metals and metalloids into soils globally because metals and metalloids are present as impurities and active compounds in agricultural chemicals (Nriagu and Pacyna 1988).
215-220) Recently we have also reported that interaction of nonmetal (fluoride) with metalloid (arsenic) also lead to some antagonistic effects.
Biophysico-chemical processes of heavy metals and metalloids in soil environments.
Due to the low bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil, not much is known about the natural accumulation of these pollutants in plants (i.
Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is a toxic and carcinogenic metalloid found at high concentrations in drinking water in many regions around the world [International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) 2004].
Summarizes the available world literature on trace metal and metalloid concentrations in tissues of representative field populations
Arsenic is a metalloid element that is encountered primarily as arsenical compounds.
Arsenic is a widely distributed toxic metalloid in natural ecosystems and accounts for 0.
Following the introduction, 15 chapters discuss polymer structure, molecular weight of polymers, naturally occurring polymers, step-reaction polymerization, ionic chain-reaction and complex coordination polymerizations, free radical chain polymerizations, copolymerization, organometallic and metalloid polymers, inorganic polymers, reactions of polymers, spectrometric characterization and testing of polymers, rheology and physical tests, additives, synthesis of reactants and intermediates for polymers, and polymer technology.
The automotive industry's response to the LubriLon line of metalloid fusion lubrication products was outstanding.