metal


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Related to metal: heavy metal

metal

 [met´'l]
any chemical element marked by luster, malleability, ductility, and conductivity of electricity and heat, and which will ionize positively in solution. adj., adj metal´lic.
alkali metal one of a group of monovalent elements including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium.
metal fume fever an occupational disorder with malaria-like symptoms occurring in those engaged in welding and other metallic operations and due to the volatilized metals. It includes brassfounder's fever (brass chill, brazier's chill) and spelter's fever (zinc chill, zinc fume fever).
heavy metal one with a high specific gravity, usually defined to be above 5.0.
heavy metal poisoning poisoning with any of the heavy metals, particularly antimony, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, thallium, or zinc.
noble metal a metal that is highly resistant to oxidation and corrosion.

met·al (M),

(met'ăl),
One of the electropositive elements, either amphoteric or basic, usually characterized by properties such as luster, malleability, ductility, the ability to conduct electricity, and the tendency to lose rather than gain electrons in chemical reactions.
[L. metallum, a mine, a mineral, fr. G. metallon, a mine, pit]

metal

/met·al/ (met´'l) any element marked by luster, malleability, ductility, and conductivity of electricity and heat and which will ionize positively in solution.metal´lic
alkali metal  any of a group of monovalent metals, including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium.
heavy metal  one with a high specific gravity, usually defined as over 5.0; some cause heavy metal poisoning.

metal

Etymology: Gk, metallon, a mine
an element that conducts heat and electricity, is malleable and ductile, and forms positively charged ions (cations). About 80% of the known elements are metals.

metal

An element generally characterised by conductivity, ductility, lustre and malleability.

met·al

(met'ăl)
One of the electropositive elements, either amphoteric or basic, characterized by luster, malleability, ductility, the ability to conduct electricity and heat, and the tendency to lose rather than gain electrons in chemical reactions.
[L. metallum, a mine, a mineral, fr. G. metallon, a mine, pit]

metal,

n one of the five phases, or elements, in Chinese cosmological and medical theory, whose characteristic manifestations include analysis, logic, morality, pessimism, precision, and self-control.

met·al

(met'ăl)
One of the electropositive elements, either amphoteric or basic, characterized by luster, malleability, ductility, the ability to conduct electricity and heat, and the tendency to lose rather than gain electrons in chemical reactions.
[L. metallum, a mine, a mineral, fr. G. metallon, a mine, pit]

metal,

n an element possessing luster, malleability, ductility, and conductivity of electricity and heat.
metal, base,
n an older term referring to nonprecious metals or alloys such as iron, lead, copper, nickel, chromium, and zinc. In dentistry, the term usually refers to the stainless steel and chrome-cobalt-nickel alloys.
metal ceramic alloys,
n the fusion of ceramics (porcelain) to an alloy of two or more metals for use in restorative and prosthodontic dentistry. Examples of metal alloys employed include cobalt-chromium, gold-palladium, gold-platinum-palladium, and nickel-based alloys.
metal, fusion of,
n the blending of metals by melting together.
metal insert teeth,
n.pl See tooth, metal insert.
metal, noble,
n a precious metal, usually one that does not readily oxidize, such as gold or platinum.
metal, solidification of,
n the change of metal from the molten to the solid state.
metal, wrought,
n a cast metal that has been cold-worked in any manner.

metal

any chemical element marked by luster, malleability, ductility and conductivity of electricity and heat, and which will ionize positively in solution.

alkali metal
one of a group of monovalent elements including lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium.
metal detector
a portable electronic device used to detect metal in the reticulum of cows. Most clinically normal cows fed on prepared rations give positive results.
metal implants
see implant.
metal retriever
a long, probang-like instrument, passed orally into the reticulum in cattle for the retrieval of metallic foreign bodies that might cause traumatic reticuloperitonitis.

Patient discussion about metal

Q. Allergy to Nickel- can it happen? i though that only organic materials can cause allergy… but I started a new job that exposed me to Nickel and have, or so it seems, an allergic reaction to it…

A. Of course it can happen! Here you go:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/nickel-allergy/DS00826

Q. I was told that platinum is used in fragrances for the fullness of the spray. Please tell me more! Three years ago I was diagnosed with off the lab chart levels of platinum in my body. I have no hobby or avenue for exposure other than my work. I have sold fragrances for over ten years. Even the Regional EPA Air Quality person doesnt know where I am getting this. I was told by a health director who made some calls. He told me that platinum is used in fragrances for the "fullness of the spray". Would you please tell me more about this? Thank you!

A. Thank you Joseph83! What list of materials shall I look at? I know that the FDA doesn't regulate these products; also, I wonder if there is a masking name for platinum. I have so much of this in me, it just has to come from somewhere! I'm amazed that the EPA SUPPOSEDLY doesn't know where its coming from either.

More discussions about metal
References in periodicals archive ?
Gold conducts electricity better than all but two other metals, Webster says.
Sims also has announced plans to acquire Menzies Metals, in the Melbourne area.
Belmont Metals Inc, 330 Belmont Ave, Brooklyn, NY, 11207-4800 tel: 718/342-4900 fax: 718/342-0175#
In a nutshell: Affectionate and informative metal documentary from a scrawny longhair who knows Iron Maiden air guitar licks.
But the tides of architectural choice are shifting once again and special metal fenestration products are seeing resurgence in interest.
Metal complexes may be useful as research probes of biological function, as intermediary lead compounds in the development of non-metal-containing therapeutics, and as potential diagnostic and therapeutic agents.
The upshot could be a lot more metal replacing plastic, rather than the other way around, says Caltech metallurgist William L.
Aluminium for example, though one of the commonest elements, was a precious metal until the end of the nineteenth century, and was used largely decoratively for a decade or two after it was possible to smelt the metal economically (think for instance of Otto Wagner's ornamental cast aluminium bolt heads at the 1906 Post Office Savings Bank in Vienna).
Think about the metal you come into contact with every day.
Rubber-to-metal adhesion was determined by tensile testing a rubber specimen cured between two metal coupons.
SW's editor, Karen McNulty, underwent this surgery eight years ago, when doctors implanted four metal screws in her left ankle to fix a smash-up softball injury.