metacommunication

metacommunication

[-kəmyo̅o̅′nikā′shən]
Etymology: Gk, meta + L, communicare, to inform
communication that indicates how verbal information should be interpreted; stimuli surrounding the verbal communication that also have meaning, which may or may not be congruent with that of or support the verbal talk. It may support or contradict verbal communication.
References in periodicals archive ?
Play and Ritual: Complementary Frames of Metacommunication.
This can be evidenced by their metacommunication at the close of the project:
He identifies strategies for structuring the classroom environment, communicating class routines and expectations, and cultivating a growth mindset; intervention strategies like active listening, metacommunication, encouragement and feedback, and ignoring behavior; strategies for developing social and emotional intelligence, including self-regulation, recognizing feelings in the self and others, calming oneself, social awareness, and developing relationships; and strategies to try when nothing else works, such as puppets, music, wiggle seats, and aromatherapy.
Metacommunication could be called communication or information about the act of communication itself, and may take almost any communicative form: eye-rolling, shrugs, tonal qualities, and facial gestures.
According to the noted ethnologist and anthropologist Gregory Bateson (1972), rough-and-tumble play helps children develop symbolic thinking and metacommunication.
The counselor can construct tentative hypotheses about the family's life experiences and share them using the children's art work, metacommunication, metaphors, and bibliotherapy to increase awareness and create insight into their life experiences.
As a holistic process, PBL engages individuals at the cognitive and behavioural level providing opportunity for them to participate in intra- and interpersonal processes where metacommunication is the integrative device that connects reflection to action.
In addition, the capacity for self-reflection and metacommunication typically collapses (Pizer & Pizer, 2006).
In order to produce meaning, one must read the metacommunication of the performance along with all other elements of their conduct in a given social context.
Turner makes this point when he notes that play in liminality "involves metacommunication and metalanguages" (Turner, 1992:151), and that in the liminoid state, "mundane axioms become problematic" (p.
These are all productive uses of metacommunication.
One way correctional administrators might approach the inclusion of such metacommunication would be to introduce into training sessions the role-play of dilemmatic scenarios (i.