metacognition

(redirected from metacognitions)
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metacognition

 [met″ah-kog-nish´un]
an educational process that incorporates knowledge about one's abilities, the demands of given tasks, and potentially effective learning strategies; it involves self-regulation via planning, predicting, monitoring, regulating, evaluating, and revising strategies.

metacognition

A form of critical thinking, which is a key criterion for acquiring and assessing new information. For scientific thought, metacognition entails awareness of one’s background knowledge, assumptions, and auxiliary hypotheses regarding how an observation occurs and in assessing its validity.

metacognition

(met-a-kog-nish'un) plural.metacognitions
Awareness of the knowledge one possesses and one's ability to apply that knowledge.
See: insight
References in periodicals archive ?
There seem to be differences according to lucidity features between sexes, and the relationship between subdomains of lucidity and metacognition might lead to new therapeutic approaches to several psychiatric disorders such as anxiety disorders.
Keywords: Lucid dream, dream anxiety, metacognition
Dreaming is a state characterized by delusional thought, bizarre or peculiar dream pattern with gaps, deficiencies in judgment and metacognition, and complete lack of insight (1,2).
The translated version of Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (Wells and Cart- Wright Hatton 2004) was used as an instrument for data collection.
A short form of metacognitions questionnaire: properties of the MCQ 30.
Flavell (1976) first introduced the term metacognition in which he referred as one's knowledge concerning one's own cognitive processes or anything related to them".
Loosely defined, metacognition is often referred to as "thinking about thinking.
Although the literature reviewing metacognition as it relates specifically to math anxiety is fairly sparse, research does provide some indication of metacognitive processes or perceptions that do relate to math performance.
However, they found that individuals with low anxiety were better able to use metacognition in a positive way than their highly anxious counterparts.
Our purpose-centered approach to career development focuses on five key elements that reinforce the development of purpose: identity, self-efficacy, metacognition, culture, and service.
Metacognition consists of knowledge of cognition and regulation of cognition.
Children's metacognition about reading: Issues in definition, measurement, and instruction.