metachronous

me·tach·ro·nous

(mĕ-tak'rō-nŭs),
Not synchronous; multiple separate occurrences, such as multiple primary cancers developing at intervals.
[meta- + G. chronos, time]

metachronous

adjective Referring to lesions or conditions that appear at times differing from an event of interest—i.e., not synchronous.

metachronous

adjective Referring to conditions that appear at times differing from an event of interest–ie, not synchronous

metachronous

(mĕ-tăk′ră-nŭs) [″ + Gr. chronos, time]
Occurring at a different time than another similar event. The term is the antonym of synchronous. It is often used to describe two or more tumors of similar pathological type detected at different times within the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prognostic impact of adjuvant chemotherapy after hepatic resection for synchronous and early metachronous colorectal liver metastases.
23) Second, IPMNs are often multifocal, and patients are therefore at risk for both synchronous and metachronous disease throughout the entire pancreas.
To the Editor: Multiple primary lung cancer (MPLC) refers to the synchronous or metachronous appearance of more than one primary lung cancer in a single patient.
Speaking about indications he mentioned Ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, Indeterminate colitis, Lynch syndrome, Familial adenomatous polyposis besides Multiple synchronous or metachronous cancers.
Clinical manifestations are highly variable as there may be focal or multi-organ involvement (with a synchronous or metachronous pattern): meninges, orbital tissue, salivary glands, thyroid, lungs, pericardium, pancreas, hepatobiliary tract, kidneys, lymph nodes (up to 80% of cases), aorta, retroperitoneum, prostates, breasts, and skin.
There are some malignant disease associations like synchronous or metachronous ovarian, colonic and endometrial tumours with Breast cancer.
SPT, SYNCHRONOUS AND METACHRONOUS PRIMARIES, AND SECOND FIELD TUMORS (SFT)
5) Synchronous bilateral testicular tumours, metachronous contralateral tumours, or a tumour in a solitary testis with normal preoperative testosterone levels have been included as indications for TSS when tumour volume is less than 30% of the testicular volume and surgical rules are respected.
As more and more patients live longer after the initial diagnosis of breast cancer, clinicians see an increasing number of late recurrences and contralateral metachronous breast cancer.
Patients with a history of breast cancer are at increased risk for developing a synchronous (1-3%) or a metachronous (5-7%) breast cancer in the ipsilateral or contralateral breast.
At presentation, the first synchronous KT patient had a palpable umbilical mass, the second had a perforated peptic ulcer, and the metachronous KT patient had an ovarian lesion, detected postoperatively.