metacestode


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met·a·ces·tode

(met'ă-ses'tōd),
The larval stages of a tapeworm, including the metamorphosis of the oncosphere to the first evidence of sexuality in the adult worm, differentiation of the scolex, and beginning of proglottid formation; it includes the procercoid and plerocercoid stages of pseudophyllid cestodes, and the cysticercus, cysticercoid, coenurus, and hydatid stages of cyclophyllidean cestodes.

metacestode

larval stage of cestodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
vogeli cestodes (adult cestode carriers; wild rodents, especially pacas (Cuniculus paca), may be the most common intermediate hosts (larvae or metacestode carriers) (2).
An aberrant acephalic metacestode and other parasites of Masticophis flagellum (Reptilia: Serpentes) from Texas.
Humans are intermediate hosts in which the infective metacestode stage develops after peroral infection with eggs.
Hepatic cystic echinococcosis is caused by infection with the metacestode stage of the tapeworm Echinococcosis granulosus.
Heavy metacestode infection in pigs may cause fever, muscle pains, weakness, or, if the CNS is involved, meningencephalitis or epilepsy.
villosum, the metacestode Nybelinia surmenicola, the digenean metacercaria Otodistomum sp.
The larvae then enter the metacestode (adult larva) stage, becoming a cysticercus.
The resorption of Tylocephalum metacestode larvae has also been reported in other bivalves with the exception of the pearl oyster Pinctada spp.
We describe the identification of a previously genetically uncharacterized species within the newly proposed Taeniid (Cestoda) genus Versteria (1), which caused fatal metacestode infection in a captive juvenile Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus).
In human infections, after a person ingests eggs, the metacestode cells of E.
Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE), caused by the metacestode stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis, is a rare zoonosis in Germany, mainly occurring in the south (1).
After a reexamination of material previously misconstrued by others, Thatcher and Sousa concluded that a metacestode found in a nutria (Myocastor coypus), a South American rodent that had died in a United States zoo, was the larval stage of E.