metabolic disease


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to metabolic disease: Metabolic Bone Disease

metabolic

 [met″ah-bol´ik]
pertaining to or of the nature of metabolism.
metabolic disease a disease caused by some defect in the chemical reactions of the cells of the body.
metabolic syndrome a combination including at least three of the following: abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, low level of high-density lipoproteins, hypertension, and high fasting plasma glucose level. It is associated with an increased risk for development of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.

met·a·bol·ic dis·ease

generic term for disease caused by an abnormal metabolic process. It can be congenital, due to inherited enzyme abnormality, or acquired, due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of function of a metabolic important organ such as the liver.

paraneoplastic syndrome

Oncology A co-morbid condition due to the indirect–remote or 'biologic' effects of malignancy, which may be the first sign of a neoplasm or its recurrence; PSs occur in > 15% of CAs, are caused by hormones, growth factors, biological response modifiers, and other as-yet unidentified factors, and may regress with treatment of the primary tumor. See Ectopic hormone.
Paraneoplastic syndromes
GI tract, eg anorexia, vomiting, protein-losing enteropathy, liver disease
Hematologic, eg leukemoid reaction, reactive eosinophilia, peripheral 'cytoses or 'cytopenias, hemolysis, DIC, thromboembolism, thrombophlebitis migrans
Hormonal effects
Metabolic disease, eg lactic acidosis, hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy, hyperamylasemia, hyperlipidemia
Neuromuscular, eg peripheral neuropathy, myopathy, CNS, spinal cord degeneration, inflammation
Renal, eg nephrotic syndrome, uric acid nephropathy
Skin, eg bullous mucocutaneous lesions, acquired ichthyosis, acanthosis nigricans, dermatomyositis
Others, eg callus formation, hypertension, and amyloidosis

acute abdomen

A relatively nonspecific symptom complex, in which a Pt is first seen in a 'toxic' state, complaining of incapacitating abdominal pain, variably accompanied by fever, and leukocytosis; AA may also be defined as an acute intra-abdominal inflammatory process that may require surgical intervention; appendicitis is the most common cause of an AA; nearly 100 other conditions may present in a similar fashion, in particular, ruptured ectopic pregnancy in a fallopian tube, ruptured acute diverticulitis and acute mesenteric lymphadenitis.
Acute abdomen etiology
Infection
Amebiasis, hepatitis, falciparum malaria, pneumococcal pneumonia, rheumatic fever, salmonella gastroenteritis, staphylococcal toxemia, syphilis in 'tabetic crisis,' trichinosis, TB, typhoid fever, viral enteritides, herpes zoster, infectious mononucleosis, Whipple's disease
Inflammation
Appendicitis, cholangitis, cholecystitis, Crohn's disease, diverticulitis, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, SLE, mesenteric lymphadenitis, pancreatitis, peritonitis due to organ perforation, perinephric abscesses, pyelonephritis, ulcerative colitis, intestinal obstruction, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa, Henoch-Schönlein disease
Intoxication
Black widow spider bite, heavy metals, mushrooms
Ischemia
Renal infarction, mesenteric arterial thrombosis
Malignancy
Pain due to organ infarction, Hodgkin's disease ('classically' associated with alcohol ingestion), leukemia, lymphoproliferative disorders
Metabolic disease
Adrenal insufficiency (Addisonian crisis), DKA, familial hyperlipoproteinemia, familial Mediterranean fever, hemochromatosis, hereditary angioneurotic edema, hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, acute intermittent porphyria, uremia, substance abuse withdrawal
Ob/Gyn
Twisted ovarian cyst, ectopic pregnancy, endometriosis, PD
Referred pain
Pneumonia, MI, pleuritis, pericarditis, myocarditis, hematomata of the rectal muscle, renal colic, peptic ulcer, nerve root compression
Trauma
Perforation/rupture–aortic aneurysm, spleen, bladder

met·a·bol·ic dis·ease

(met-ă-bolik di-zēz)
Generic term for disease caused by an abnormal metabolic process; can be congenital, due to inherited enzyme abnormality, or acquired, due to disease of an endocrine organ or failure of function of a metabolic important organ.

metabolic disease,

n a disorder that causes dysfunction of the metabolic action of the body, resulting in loss of control of homeostasis.

disease

traditionally defined as a finite abnormality of structure or function with an identifiable pathological or clinicopathological basis, and with a recognizable syndrome or constellation of clinical signs.
This definition has long since been widened to embrace subclinical diseases in which there is no tangible clinical syndrome but which are identifiable by chemical, hematological, biophysical, microbiological or immunological means. The definition is used even more widely to include failure to produce at expected levels in the presence of normal levels of nutritional supply and environmental quality. It is to be expected that the detection of residues of disqualifying chemicals in foods of animal origin will also come to be included within the scope of disease.
For specific diseases see under the specific name, e.g. Aujeszsky's disease, Bang's disease, foot-and-mouth disease.

air-borne disease
the causative agent is transmitted via the air without the need for intervention by other medium. See also wind-borne disease.
disease carrier
clinical disease
see clinical (3).
disease cluster
a group of animals with the same disease occurs at an unusual level of prevalence for the population as a whole. The cluster may be in space, with high concentrations in particular localities, or in time, with high concentrations in particular seasons or in particular years.
communicable disease
infectious disease in which the causative agents may pass or be carried from one animal to another directly or indirectly on inanimate objects or via vectors.
complicating disease
one that occurs in the course of some other disease as a complication.
constitutional disease
one involving a system of organs or one with widespread signs.
contagious disease
see communicable disease (above).
disease control
reducing the prevalence of a disease in a population, including eradication, by chemical, pharmaceutical, quarantine, management including culling, or other means or combinations of means.
disease control programs
organized routines specifying agents, administration, time and personnel allocations, community support, funding, participation of corporate or government agencies, animal and animal product disposal.
deficiency disease
a condition due to dietary or metabolic deficiency, including all diseases caused by an insufficient supply of essential nutrients.
degenerative joint disease
see degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis.
demyelinating disease
any condition characterized by destruction of myelin.
disease determinant
any variable associated with a disease which, if removed or altered, results in a change in the incidence of the disease.
egg-borne disease
an infectious disease of birds in which the agent is spread via the egg.
endemic disease
see endemic.
environmental disease control
control by changing the environment, e.g. draining a swamp, ventilating a barn.
epidemic disease
etiological disease classification
diseases arranged in the order of their etiological agents, e.g. bacterial, mycoplasma.
exotic disease
a disease that does not occur in the subject country. Said of infectious diseases that may be introduced, e.g. rabies is exotic to the UK, contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is exotic to the USA.
focal disease
a localized disease.
fulminant disease
an explosive outbreak in a group or a rapidly developing, peracute development of a disease in an individual. Called also fulminating.
functional disease
any disease involving body functions but not associated with detectable organic lesion or change.
generalized disease
one involving all or many body systems; often said of infectious diseases in which there is spread via the bloodstream. See also systemic disease (below).
glycogen disease
any of a group of genetically determined disorders of glycogen metabolism, marked by abnormal storage of glycogen in the body tissues. See also glycogen storage disease.
heavy chain disease
hemolytic disease of newborn
see alloimmune hemolytic anemia of the newborn.
hemorrhagic disease of newborn
see neonatal hemorrhagic disease.
disease history
that part of a patient's history which relates only to the disease from which the patient is suffering.
holoendemic disease
most animals in the population are affected.
hyperendemic disease
the rate of infection is steady but high.
hypoendemic disease
the rate of infection is steady and only a few animals are infected.
immune complex disease
see immune complex disease.
infectious disease
one caused by small living organisms including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa and metazoan parasites. It may be contagious in origin, result from nosocomial infections or be due to endogenous microflora of the nose and throat, skin or bowel. See also communicable disease (above).
manifestational disease classification
diseases arranged in the order of their clinical signs, epidemiological characteristics, necropsy lesions, e.g. sudden death diseases.
mesoendemic disease
the disease occurs at an even rate and a moderate proportion of animals are infected.
metabolic disease
see metabolic diseases.
molecular disease
any disease in which the pathogenesis can be traced to a single, precise chemical alteration, usually of a protein, which is either abnormal in structure or present in reduced amounts. The corresponding defect in the DNA coding for the protein may also be known.
multicausal disease
1. a number of causative agents are needed to combine to cause the disease.
2. the same disease can be caused by a number of different agents.
multifactorial disease
see multicausal disease (above).
new disease
disease not previously recorded. May be variants on an existing disease, e.g. infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, or escapes from other species, e.g. the Marburg virus disease of humans.
notifiable disease
a disease of which any occurrence is required by law to be notified to government authorities.
organic disease
see organic disease.
pandemic disease
a very widespread epidemic involving several countries or an entire continent.
quarantinable disease
a disease which the law requires to be restricted in its spread by putting the affected animals, farms or properties on which it occurs in quarantine.
reportable disease
see notifiable disease (above).
disease reservoir
any animal or fomite in which an infectious disease agent is preserved in a viable state or multiplies and upon which it may depend for survival.
secondary disease
1. a disease subsequent to or a consequence of another disease or condition.
2. a condition due to introduction of incompatible, immunologically competent cells into a host rendered incapable of rejecting them by heavy exposure to ionizing radiation.
self-limited disease
sex-limited disease
disease limited in its occurrence to one or other sex. See also sex-linked.
sexually transmitted disease (STD)
a disease that can be acquired by sexual intercourse.
slaughter disease control
see slaughter (2).
sporadic disease
occurring singly and haphazardly; widely scattered; not epidemic or endemic. See also sporadic bovine encephalomyelitis, sporadic leukosis, sporadic lymphangitis.
storage disease
disease syndrome
systemic disease
sufficiently widespread in the body to cause clinical signs referable to any organ or system, and in which localization of infection may occur in any organ.
disease triangle
interaction between the host, the disease agent, and the environment.
disease wastage
loss of income generated by production of milk, eggs, fiber, or loss of capital value because of diminution in the patient's value.
wasting disease
any disease marked especially by progressive emaciation and weakness.
zoonotic disease
disease capable of spread from animals to humans. See also zoonosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obesity is a global healthcare issue that is associated with an increased risk of serious metabolic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, stroke, dyslipidemia, and osteoarthritis.
I strongly recommend this useful book for clinical and laboratory personnel working in the field of inherited metabolic diseases.
In the United States, the majority of commercial health plans assign most metabolic disease therapies to tiers 2 or 3 of their formularies.
Metabolic Surgery Expected to Play Bigger Role in Treating Type 2 Diabetes And Other Metabolic Diseases
Goll-Ohio Eminent Scholar and Professor of Molecular Biology, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Konneker Research Center, Ohio University, commented, "This article provides an elegant and comprehensive survey of the essential connections between metabolic disease pathways and aging.
Elixir's product pipeline includes a number of products which the Company believes will have significant advantages over existing products and will address unmet medical needs of the large metabolic disease markets.
Readers can obtain a complete understanding of the chief diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases tests -- predictive, screening, prognostic, monitoring, pharmacogenomic, and theranostic -- from their basic principles to their applications and also discover feasible market opportunities via an identification of high-growth applications in different therapeutic areas, with a focus on the biggest and expanding markets for diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases.
Assess the diabetes, obesity and metabolic disease market drivers and bottlenecks, from the perspective of the medical and scientific communities.
O2P[TM] Technology to Support Clinical Research Study with the Institute of Metabolic Disease
Elixir is a Cambridge, MA-based biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and commercializing drugs to treat and prevent metabolic disease, prevent age-related diseases, ultimately extending the quality and length of human life.