metabolic demand


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metabolic demand

Abbreviation: Q/VO2.
The cardiac output divided by the oxygen uptake.
See also: demand
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, using HR-based methods should allow coaches and players alike to better understand and estimate the metabolic demands during professional rugby union games
But no studies had been reported so far in young trained swimmers about their metabolic status after they performed with their maximal effort in water Actual metabolic demand can only be estimated when they perform their event in water but not in the laboratory.
14) compared blood lactate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) from MMA official matches to three different training sessions, including sparring bouts, and concluded that these training sessions successfully replicated the metabolic demands, specifically lactate concentrations, of the competitive environment.
These systems are based on the measurement of transthoracic impedance that correlates with respiration and oxygen consumption and is proportional to metabolic demand.
Several biomechanical factors relating to the loss of the ankle plantar flexor musculature have been associated with the high metabolic demand of walking in individuals with TTA.
In this way, blood lactate concentration ([La]) has a remarkable importance for the knowledge of the metabolic demands on the lifeguards in situ to allow coaches to effectively structure training programs (14) and recovery strategies during saving and training (15).
The promising reality here is that for any given amount of weight support, metabolic demand can be increased by increasing walking or running speed.
Normally CBF is coupled to metabolic demand of tissue, with normal flow greater than 50 ml/100 g/min.
6) The brain has numerous physiological mechanisms to maintain blood flow to meet metabolic demand, without jeopardising the delicate balance of factors that maintain ICP.
Heart failure (HF) is defined as an inadequate ability by the heart to pump enough blood to meet the blood-flow and metabolic demand of the body.
Growth and reproduction depends on different biotic and abiotic constraints like food availability, environmental conditions, metabolic demand, and the requirements of different tissues (Gabbott 1983, Mathieu & Lubet 1993).