mesmerism


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Related to mesmerism: animal magnetism

hypnotism

 [hip´no-tizm]
the study of or the method or practice of inducing hypnosis.

mes·mer·ism

(mes'mer-izm),
A system of therapeutics from which were developed hypnotism and therapeutic suggestion.
[F.A. Mesmer, Austrio-Hungarian physician, 1734-1815]

mesmerism

/mes·mer·ism/ (mez´mer-izm) hypnotism.

mesmerism

(mĕz′mə-rĭz′əm, mĕs′-)
n.
1. A strong or spellbinding appeal; fascination.
2. Hypnotic induction believed to involve animal magnetism.
3. Hypnotism.

mes·mer′ic (-mĕr′ĭk) adj.
mes·mer′i·cal·ly adv.
mes′mer·ist n.

mesmerism

[mez′məriz′əm]
Etymology: Franz A. Mesmer, Austrian physician, 1734-1815
a practice of hypnotism introduced by Mesmer, who believed human health was affected by "celestial magnetic forces." Some patients were reported cured or experienced diminished symptoms by undergoing a "grand crisis," or seizure, while under hypnosis. Mesmer was regarded as a fraud by the medical profession, but his work led to serious studies of the health effects of the power of suggestion.
A method of hypnosis that allegedly placed patients in a trance-like state deep enough to allow major surgery without pain, or awareness of the operation, named for Austrian physician Franz Anton Mesmer, who developed it

mes·mer·ism

(mes'mĕr-izm)
A system of therapeutics from which were developed hypnotism and therapeutic suggestion.

Mesmer,

Franz Anton, Austrian physician, 1733-1815.
mesmeric crisis - reaction technique. Synonym(s): grand crisis; magnetic crisis
mesmerism - the use of hypnotism as practiced by Mesmer.

mesmerism (mezˑ·m·riˈ·zm),

n.pr the therapy advanced by the German Doctor Franz Mesmer, which involved using the power of “animal magnetism” to put people into trance; considered the predecessor of modern hypnosis. See also animal magnetism.

mes·mer·ism

(mes'mĕr-izm)
A system of therapeutics from which hypnotism and therapeutic suggestion developed.

Patient discussion about mesmerism

Q. HYPNOSIS can hypnosis be used in bi-polar disorder?

A. there is no reason why not. people with bipolar disorder can be susceptible to hypnosis like any others. but like all population the ability to be hypnotized is variable. some are very suggestible and some are not. doesn't say anything on the person- very smart and intelligent people can be hypnotized.

Q. How effective is hypnosis in treating alcoholism? And how expensive is it? I've already tried hypnotherapy for social anxiety problems but the guy was a useless quack and I didn't even go under properly.

A. Hypnosis is a very effective treatment for addictions, it was used back in the 19th century as one but the use of hypnosis today is smaller then before. Here is a web page with some info about it:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4087/is_200407/ai_n9425378

More discussions about mesmerism
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the French Revolution is here regarded as being a "mesmerisation" (a steeping into illusion) of France and of Europe: it was triggered and governed precisely by what Christianity called evil or Satan, or what mesmerism called a "primitive and elemental force" (The spirit rapper, chap.
Unchallenged in their one-way optical relationship with sleep, Dickens's sleep-watchers thus bask in the "fantasy of power over the body" that Steven Connor associates with the hypnotist's gaze in the culture of Victorian mesmerism (16).
We are struck by their commitment to pseudosciences, such as mesmerism and phrenology, but their careers are a good reminder that it has always been difficult to separate real science from pseudo-science in flee-wheeling America.
The reader learns details of Maggs's life from the autobiography he writes for Henry Phipps and, almost simultaneously, watches Oates learn most of those details through the sessions of mesmerism.
Margaret Oakes Smith believed that mesmerism enabled access to a vision of liberated femininity that was essential to feminist politics; Mary Clemmer suggests that "language" can be "turned and intensified to figure forth the sensuous sour," thereby enabling a "transformative movement between vision and reality" (125); and the image of the Indian pipe in Pauline Hopkins's Winona expresses "black femininity through the play of spirit and matter" (165).
Far from rejecting science as a whole, these figures sought to link "scientific revolution" to race revolution by incorporating phrenology, mesmerism, physiology, and other fields of popular science into their acts and lectures.
Braid reexamined Mesmer's process and found that suggestion alone was just as effective as mesmerism (Bryan, 1963).
The texts examined in Chapter 3, "Strange Forces: Exploring the Limits of Science" present alternative routes to individual and social betterment: Theosophy, Magnetism, Spiritism, Mesmerism and other noncanonical belief systems, because they were imported from Europe, enjoyed an aura of credibility and even prestige in some Latin American circles.
Songs never get more graceful than the reflective repose Only Me - songwriting at its understated brilliance - and the gently rolling glory of Elizabeth through to the swirling mesmerism of Follow The Road.
In her second chapter Garrison goes on to look at the uses of mesmerism and spiritualism ('magnetic sciences') within sensation novels.
This is especially heartening because American consciousness is enveloped in the mesmerism of false consciousness regarding fundamental issues of class, social policy, economy, and race.