meristem


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Related to meristem: lateral meristem, primary meristem

meristem

or

meristematic tissue

a region of a plant in which active cell division (MITOSIS) occurs, the cells of the meristem not being differentiated into a specialist form. Meristematic tissues occur at the root and shoot tips (see APICAL MERISTEM giving growth in length, while increase in girth of the plant is produced by the CAMBIUM of VASCULAR BUNDLES and the INTERFASCICULAR CAMBIUM. Note that such specialist dividing zones are not found in animals, where cell division occurs in most tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, the meristem will be named as secondary thickening meristem (STM) or the monocot cambium, as these two terms most frequently appear in the current literature.
In the developing fruits of Fabaceae (Leguminosae) and Rutaceae usually occurs the installation of ventral or adaxial meristem which originates from the ovary epidermis and/or mesophyll (ROTH, 1977; SOUZA, 2006).
This midge attacks the terminal meristem of a developing shoot, producing an apical bunch or rosette gall that provides protection for the developing midges and a habitat for a community of other insects.
Because we clipped aspens on the main stem, a loss of apical meristem dominance may help explain the compensatory response we observed.
As explained in Barthelemy and Caraglio (2007), organogenesis results from the functioning of undifferentiated cells constituting the apical meristem and located at the tip of axes.
Despite this, they were able to recover from the meristem and continue growth but with a yield penalty.
This is the first interim dividend since E Wood Holdings merged with Meristem in March 2000.
Abnormal binuclear, tetranuclear cells, large cells with large nuclei, and giant cells with giant nuclei were observed in the meristem zones of the root apices.
The flanking meristem, and rib meristem were high in nuclear RNA, while the metrameristem was relatively low in RNA.
People ask us what we do with the fruit," he says, snapping a tender new shoot from a pear tree and stripping it of its leaves until he holds just the transplantable meristem, the tiny genetic essence of a pear tree.
To understand why Fibonacci numbers predominate in spiral plants, Gole and Atela started with the theories of 19th-century botanist Wilhelm Hofmeister, who observed that a plant's leaves emerge at the least-crowded spot around a circular meristem, or growing tip.
The farmer would cut out the centre or meristem, the active growing part of the plant.