mentor

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mentor

 [men´tor] (pl. men·tor)
a person with more experience in a given area who takes responsibility for helping someone with less experience to develop needed knowledge and skills.

mentor

[men′tər]
Etymology: Gk, Mentor, mythic educator
1 a more experienced, trusted adviser or counselor who offers helpful guidance to less experienced colleagues.
2 a person who enters into a relationship with a new nurse to provide him or her with a source of support and information as he or she learns new roles.

mentor

A professional and role model who advises and provides feedback for a junior colleague. Mentors may be a resource for career advancement, graduate clinical, research and publishing opportunities, funding, credential support, and obtaining tenure-track positions.

mentor

Graduate education  A professional and a role model who gives attention and feedback to a junior colleague
References in periodicals archive ?
Most mentors - if you're lucky - are high-ranking insiders in your own company.
Eighty-two percent thought the program effectively assists proteges or the organization, and they recommended assigning mentors to all new sworn employees and expanding the program to other workgroups.
In this study, both the supports from environment and from mentors were significant predictors of efficacy information of student teachers.
Typically [mentors] have a wider viewpoint than the person they are mentoring, so they can see opportunities before you might get wind of them," says Donna Fowler, national president of the Professional Coaches and Mentors Association.
Barrier-busting mentors, who reside outside of your institution and enable you to form non-traditional alliances, such as with colleagues at another institution.
Friend became Wen's formal mentor after Wen entered the firm's Mentoring Partnership Program.
Eight urban teacher mentors were purposefully selected from the mentoring program in one urban school district in a Midwestern state.
Mentors must be models of wellness that can encourage the development of habits such as conflict resolution, discernment, and good decisionmaking skills.
In some cases, mentors, youth and program managers may need guidance on how to facilitate the inclusion of youth with disabilities.
Specifically, visualization techniques can assist the students' transition toward realizing possible selves; students envision themselves in future scenarios, and mentors help through discussion and feedback (Fletcher, 2000).
The pilot scheme would involve using the external consultant both to support mentors and to supervise their accreditation for a City and Guilds short award in mentoring.
A few more UG's reported a sense of intimidation of having the G mentors in the class with them than the other way around.