mental image

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men·tal im·age

a picture of an object not present, produced in the mind by memory or imagination.

mental image

any concept or sensation produced in the mind through memory or imagination.

men·tal im·age

(men'tăl im'ăj)
A picture of an object not present, produced in the mind by memory or imagination.

mental image,

n visual thought of a thing or event.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, it coincides with a general tendency in cognitive science, including standard theories of mental imagery, to privilege referential over verbal images and, within the referential domain, to privilege the visual over other sensory modalities.
Cortical changes after mental imagery training combined with electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation in patients with chronic stroke.
Such techniques can be augmented by other strategies such as: comprehension monitoring, self-explanations, mental imagery, identification of the main idea, previewing, predicting, and summarising text etc.
Discovering the boundary between the two major determiners of image content (in particular, between what we know or intend and the constraints imposed by the mechanisms on the particular form of representation used--in other words, by the way our brain is structured) is the central problem in the study of mental imagery.
According to van den Broek and Kremer (2000), students use mental imagery in reading to depict key text elements such as events, facts, and setting and to illustrate meaningful relationships between elements.
The mental images conjured up by fantasies increase sexual arousal and many, many women use the kind of mental imagery you describe to turn themselves on.
The motivational function of mental imagery for participation in sport and exercise.
In this issue of the Quarterly, our writers examine mental imagery both historical and personal.
Cunningham then reviews basic techniques in mind-body healing: learning to relax body and mind, and becoming acquainted with and beginning to modify streams of thoughts through the use of mental imagery.
For example, mental imagery mnemonics are popular memory-improvement techniques used particularly in list-learning paradigms and, typically, these techniques involve the formation of vivid and unusual associations between to-be-remembered items and certain numerically ordered 'pegwords,' for example, one is a bun, two is a shoe, and so forth.
The book explores methods for achieving personal goals using self-assessment, self-reward, self-talk, mental imagery, team thinking and other current concepts and exercises.