mental age

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age

 [āj]
1. the duration, or the measure of time of the existence of a person or object.
2. to undergo change as a result of passage of time.
achievement age a measure of achievement expressed in terms of the chronologic age of a normal child showing the same degree of attainment.
chronologic age the actual measure of time elapsed since a person's birth.
developmental age
1. age estimated from the degree of anatomical development.
2. in psychology, the age of an individual determined by degree of emotional, mental, anatomical, and physiological maturation.
gestational age see gestational age.
mental age the age level of mental ability of a person as gauged by standard intelligence tests.

men·tal age (MA),

a measure, expressed in years and months, of a child's intelligence relative to age norms as determined by testing with the Stanford-Binet intelligence scale.

mental age

n. Abbr. MA
A measure of intellectual development as determined by an intelligence test, expressed as the age at which that test score is typically attained. It was formerly used in calculating intelligence quotients but is now generally used only for children and people with intellectual disability.

mental age (MA)

the age level at which one functions intellectually, as determined by standardized psychological and intelligence tests and expressed as the age at which that level is average. Compare achievement age. See also developmental age.

men·tal age

(MA) (men'tăl āj)
A measure, expressed in years and months, of a child's intelligence relative to age norms as determined by testing with the Stanford-Binet intelligence scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is also a somewhat crude formula for converting IQ scores to a mental age that uses a denominator of 16.
Using this technique an IQ of 84 corresponds with a mental age of thirteen and a half, yielding a slightly more generous IQ ange than the PPVT-4 equivalencies.
As explained in a report by the American Psychological Association, the DSM "indicates, even a person with only 'mild' mental retardation, as the term is defined in the Manual [sixth-grade level], has a mental age below that of a teenager.
Despite the paucity of the colonial trial records, there is evidence that the notion of a mental age comparison--equating idiocy with childhood--was conceptually intuitive for the colonists.
As this Part explains, the concept of mental age, although it faces complications in both the fields of law and psychology, serves as a useful starting point for the application of idiocy protections today.
282) Furthermore, although expert witnesses differed regarding Hall's precise "mental age," all of them diagnosed him with a mental age below a fourteen-year-old.