mental age

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age

 [āj]
1. the duration, or the measure of time of the existence of a person or object.
2. to undergo change as a result of passage of time.
achievement age a measure of achievement expressed in terms of the chronologic age of a normal child showing the same degree of attainment.
chronologic age the actual measure of time elapsed since a person's birth.
developmental age
1. age estimated from the degree of anatomical development.
2. in psychology, the age of an individual determined by degree of emotional, mental, anatomical, and physiological maturation.
gestational age see gestational age.
mental age the age level of mental ability of a person as gauged by standard intelligence tests.

men·tal age (MA),

a measure, expressed in years and months, of a child's intelligence relative to age norms as determined by testing with the Stanford-Binet intelligence scale.

mental age

n. Abbr. MA
A measure of intellectual development as determined by an intelligence test, expressed as the age at which that test score is typically attained. It was formerly used in calculating intelligence quotients but is now generally used only for children and people with intellectual disability.

mental age (MA)

the age level at which one functions intellectually, as determined by standardized psychological and intelligence tests and expressed as the age at which that level is average. Compare achievement age. See also developmental age.

men·tal age

(MA) (men'tăl āj)
A measure, expressed in years and months, of a child's intelligence relative to age norms as determined by testing with the Stanford-Binet intelligence scale.
References in periodicals archive ?
James Fife, Mental Capacity, Minority, and Mental Age in Capital Sentencing: A Unified Theory of Culpability, 28 HAMLINE L.
29, 2011) (noting that a clinical psychologist examined Woodruff in 2003 and testified that he had "the mental age of someone 9 or 10 years old"); Reply Brief of Appellant, Hill v.
2006) (holding that Roper did not prohibit the execution of offenders with the mental age of a juvenile and citing Mitchell v.
1991) (noting that the mental age concept was first introduced by Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon in 1908 as a score for their intelligence test); see also ROBERT M.
Developmental Level and Psychopathology: Comparing Children with Developmental Delays to Chronological and Mental Age Matched Controls, 37 Res.
There is also a somewhat crude formula for converting IQ scores to a mental age that uses a denominator of 16.