menstrual suppression


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menstrual suppression

The use of reproductive hormones to lengthen the time between menstrual cycles. This application can lessen the frequency of diseases or conditions that occur perimenstrually.
See also: suppression
References in periodicals archive ?
The ARHP is central to the processes of securing legitimacy for menstrual suppression in the biomedical field in the USA, and beyond.
This statement makes clear the ARHP and NPWH position on menstrual suppression from the outset.
In the ARHP and NPWH journal it is clear that the therapeutic or 'medical' role of menstrual suppression is framed as only one of many factors that influence consumer choice, rather than as the primary consideration.
By invoking the concepts of informed choice and patient education in this way, much of the biomedical literature on menstrual suppression pre-empts social critique.
Instead, women described their thought processes and how they assessed the 'risks' of menstrual suppression as simultaneously happening on 'different levels', especially in terms of day-to-day concerns compared to long term planning or desires.
Echoing the study carried out by Fox and Ward (2006) on the use of medical technologies such as Viagra, the process of taking up menstrual suppression produced a range of health identities.
This account demonstrates the similarities of menstrual suppression with women's experiences of Hormone Replacement Therapy.
In biomedical accounts of menstrual suppression the notions of individual and informed choice, as well as consumer rights and responsibilities are continually (and often contradictorily) reiterated in ways that seemingly verify menstrual suppression as being a rational decision for women.
The ways in which participants negotiated discourses of risk and choice in the context of menstrual suppression validates the need for nondualistic thinking about the ways in which women take up reproductive technologies.
Menstrual suppression products are another option in the arsenal of fertility control, yes, but the manner in which they are being marketed is disconcerting.
Women's individual experiences of, and attitudes about, menstruation play an important role in determining their interest in menstrual suppression and may also affect the level of satisfaction with the method among women who use these products.