menstrual cup


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menstrual cup

n.
A rubber cup that is inserted into the vagina and placed over the cervix to collect menstrual flow.

menstrual cup

A reusable cup-shaped device made of latex, silicone or thermoplastic elastome, which is placed inside the vagina, held in place by suction and used to collect menstrual flow in lieu of absorbent pads. Menstrual cups are more cost-efficient and environmentally friendly than tampons, as most are reusable, and they are the method of choice for heavy menstrual bleeding.

menstrual cup

Gynecology A reusable, cup-shaped device placed inside the vagina, held in place by suction and used to collect menstrual flow. See Menstruation.
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Retailers continue to see the growth of reusable menstrual cups in the category, and we see a trend of alternative-channel retailers adding our product to their shelves.
Starting the menstrual cup business in 2015, Tangonan believes in women empowerment and protecting the environment at the same time.
A fresh, modern look has also been important to Lunette, a menstrual cup brand founded in Finland in 2005 and now sold in over 40 countries around the world.
We believe that all women should have access to an affordable, high quality menstrual cup and are committed to keeping our retail prices low while maintaining the highest quality possible.
Technavio's report, Global Menstrual Cup Market 2016-2020, has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts.
Use of tampons or menstrual cups does not increase the risk of early expulsion of an intrauterine device, according to findings of a retrospective cohort study of nearly 1,000 women.
While sea sponges are reusable they will need to be replaced every six months as opposed to the six years or more you will get out of cloth pads or menstrual cups.
She eats good quality meat, doesn't use a rubber menstrual cup and rode the bus to school.
Current menstrual cup customers make significant retail decisions based on the availability of their preferred feminine hygiene product, according to recent research conducted by Evofem, and in general, women who buy feminine hygiene products purchase other items in the store outside of the category.
Another woman, 35, who has been using both tampons and disposable pads said she is willing to use menstrual cups next year.
And the 37-year-old, who like millions of women would use up to 200 sanitary products during her period every year, says the menstrual cup has many advantages, from cost through to convenience.