meningoencephalomyelitis


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meningoencephalomyelitis

 [mĕ-ning″go-en-sef″ah-lo-mi″ĕ-li´tis]
inflammation of the meninges, brain, and spinal cord.

me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·my·e·li·tis

(mĕ-ning'gō-en-sef'ă-lō-mī-'ĕ-lī'tis),
Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord together with their membranes.
[meningo + G. enkephalos, brain, + myelos, marrow, + -itis, inflammation]

meningoencephalomyelitis

[mining′gō·ensef′əlōmī′əlī′ tis]
a combined inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.

me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·my·e·li·tis

(mĕ-ning'gō-en-sef'ă-lō-mī-ă-lī'tis)
Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord togetherwith their membranes.
[meningo + G. enkephalos, brain, + myelos, marrow, + -itis, inflammation]

meningoencephalomyelitis

inflammation of the meninges, brain and spinal cord.

granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis
an acute, progressive disease of dogs characterized by diffuse or focal perivascular accumulations of histiocytes, lymphocytes and plasma cells in the meninges, brain and spinal cord. The distribution and severity of lesions and, accordingly, clinical signs are extremely variable, e.g. optic nerve involvement may cause blindness. The cause is unknown, but viral infection and immunological mechanisms have been suspected. Called also inflammatory reticulosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
We report the genomic characterization of a novel astrovirus (BoAstV-NeuroS1) in the brain tissue of 4 cattle from ranches in California with a clinical neurologic disorder characterized histologically as a neurotropic meningoencephalomyelitis and ganglioneuritis.
Clinical manifestations range from inapparent infection to severe meningoencephalomyelitis in humans.
Outbreak of orthoreovirus-induced meningoencephalomyelitis in baboons.
In 5%-30% of clinical cases, a second neurologic phase may occur with aseptic meningitis (50% of the cases), meningoencephalitis (40%), or meningoencephalomyelitis (10%) (1,2,7,8).
into febrile form (4 cases), aseptic meningitis (3 cases), encephalitis (2 cases), meningoencephalitis (8 cases), and meningoencephalomyelitis (3 cases) (7).
Other human pathogens in the genus Flavivirus that will be discussed in this review include yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), Israel turkey meningoencephalomyelitis virus, and Bagaza virus.
Verminous meningoencephalomyelitis by Angiostrongylus (= Parastrongylus) cantonensis in an American miniature horse.