meningoencephalomyelitis


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

meningoencephalomyelitis

 [mĕ-ning″go-en-sef″ah-lo-mi″ĕ-li´tis]
inflammation of the meninges, brain, and spinal cord.

me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·my·e·li·tis

(mĕ-ning'gō-en-sef'ă-lō-mī-'ĕ-lī'tis),
Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord together with their membranes.
[meningo + G. enkephalos, brain, + myelos, marrow, + -itis, inflammation]

meningoencephalomyelitis

[mining′gō·ensef′əlōmī′əlī′ tis]
a combined inflammation of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.

me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·my·e·li·tis

(mĕ-ning'gō-en-sef'ă-lō-mī-ă-lī'tis)
Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord togetherwith their membranes.
[meningo + G. enkephalos, brain, + myelos, marrow, + -itis, inflammation]

meningoencephalomyelitis

inflammation of the meninges, brain and spinal cord.

granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis
an acute, progressive disease of dogs characterized by diffuse or focal perivascular accumulations of histiocytes, lymphocytes and plasma cells in the meninges, brain and spinal cord. The distribution and severity of lesions and, accordingly, clinical signs are extremely variable, e.g. optic nerve involvement may cause blindness. The cause is unknown, but viral infection and immunological mechanisms have been suspected. Called also inflammatory reticulosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The meningoencephalomyelitis was largely confined to gray matter in the brain and spinal cord, with most severe lesions in the cerebellar folia and brainstem and throughout all segments of the spinal cord gray matter.
64] Four of the 13 patients had VZV encephalitis or meningoencephalomyelitis and received appropriate antiviral therapy; in 2 patients, viral DNA could no longer be detected in the CSF after therapy, and the patients' clinical conditions improved.
Detection of EV71 as the single most prevalent EV type associated with NP-AFP is of clinical significance because it is regarded as the most virulent neurotropic EV, next to poliovirus, associated with poliomyelitis-like paralytic disease, meningitis, meningoencephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, transeverse myelitis, cerebellar ataxia, opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, benign intracranial hypertension, brainstem encephalitis (34-36), and frequent epidemics of hand, foot, and mouth disease with substantial illness and death worldwide affecting >500,000 children in the Asia-Pacific region and causing >200 deaths in China during the past decade (37-39).
Clinical manifestations range from inapparent infection to severe meningoencephalomyelitis in humans.
Outbreak of orthoreovirus-induced meningoencephalomyelitis in baboons.
In 5%-30% of clinical cases, a second neurologic phase may occur with aseptic meningitis (50% of the cases), meningoencephalitis (40%), or meningoencephalomyelitis (10%) (1,2,7,8).
into febrile form (4 cases), aseptic meningitis (3 cases), encephalitis (2 cases), meningoencephalitis (8 cases), and meningoencephalomyelitis (3 cases) (7).
Other human pathogens in the genus Flavivirus that will be discussed in this review include yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), Israel turkey meningoencephalomyelitis virus, and Bagaza virus.
Verminous meningoencephalomyelitis by Angiostrongylus (= Parastrongylus) cantonensis in an American miniature horse.