meningoencephalocele


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Related to meningoencephalocele: meningoencephalitis, meningohydroencephalocele

encephalocele

 [en-sef´ah-lo-sēl″]
hernial protrusion of brain substance and meninges through a congenital or traumatic opening of the skull.
occipital encephalocele an encephalocele in the occipital region, the most common kind seen in the Western Hemisphere.
A baby with a large occipital encephalocele. From Mueller and Young, 2001.

me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·cele

(mĕ-ning'gō-en-sef'ă-lō-sēl'),
A protrusion of the meninges and brain through a congenital defect in the cranium, usually in the frontal or occipital region.
[meningo- + G. enkephalos, brain, + kēlē, hernia]

meningoencephalocele

/me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·cele/ (-en-sef´ah-lo-sēl″) encephalocele.

meningoencephalocele

[mining′gō·ensef′əlōsēl′]
Etymology: Gk, meninx + enkephalos, brain, kele, hernia
a saclike cyst containing brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and meninges that protrudes through a congenital defect in the skull. It may or may not contain parts of the ventricular system and is commonly associated with brain defects. Also called encephalomeningocele. See also neural tube defect.

me·nin·go·en·ceph·a·lo·cele

(mĕ-ning'gō-en-sef'ă-lō-sēl)
A protrusion of the meninges and brain through a congenital defect in the cranium, usually in the frontal or occipital region.
Synonym(s): encephalomeningocele.
[meningo- + G. enkephalos, brain, + kēlē, hernia]

meningoencephalocele

Protrusion of part of the brain with the covering membranes (MENINGES) through a defect in the skull. An encephalocoele.

meningoencephalocele

hernial protrusion of the meninges and brain substance through a defect in the skull.

congenital meningoencephalocele
occurs in cranium bifidum. An inherited form has been identified in Landrace pigs. The piglets are not viable. Called also cranioschisis.
inherited meningoencephalocele
possibly an inherited defect in Landrace pigs.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Lai et al, intrasphenoidal meningoencephaloceles usually present with CSF rhinorrhea.
Management of multiple spontaneous nasal meningoencephaloceles.
Based on our intraoperative findings, we believed that this area represented the skull base defect through which the meningoencephalocele arose.
The opening was enlarged in all directions to widely expose the meningoencephalocele and skull base.
We therefore ascertained that the lesion was a meningoencephalocele that had eroded the inner cortex of the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone, filled the central portion of this bone, and significantly thinned the outer cortices.
To reduce the lesion, we applied bipolar forceps to the outer aspects of the meningoencephalocele wall.
Garcia (3) reported one case and Leblanc et al (4) reported three in which a bony defect in the base of the greater wing of the sphenoid bone near the foramen rotundum allowed a meningoencephalocele to protrude into the pterygopalatine fossa.
The meningoencephalocele might have originated at a small dehiscence just lateral to the foramen rotundum, which is typical of temporal lobe encephaloceles.